Should military have to pay more for healthcare?
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Thread: Should military have to pay more for healthcare?

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    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    Default Should military have to pay more for healthcare?

    Is it fair to ask the military to pay increased healthcare costs especially when the same is not applied to government employees?


    The Obama administration?s proposed defense budget calls for military families and retirees to pay sharply more for their healthcare, while leaving unionized civilian defense workers? benefits untouched. The proposal is causing a major rift within the Pentagon, according to U.S. officials. Several congressional aides suggested the move is designed to increase the enrollment in Obamacare?s state-run insurance exchanges.

    The disparity in treatment between civilian and uniformed personnel is causing a backlash within the military that could undermine recruitment and retention.

    The proposed increases in health care payments by service members, which must be approved by Congress, are part of the Pentagon?s $487 billion cut in spending. It seeks to save $1.8 billion from the Tricare medical system in the fiscal 2013 budget, and $12.9 billion by 2017.

    Many in Congress are opposing the proposed changes, which would require the passage of new legislation before being put in place.

    ?We shouldn?t ask our military to pay our bills when we aren?t willing to impose a similar hardship on the rest of the population,? Rep. Howard ?Buck? McKeon, chairman of the House Armed Services Committee and a Republican from California, said in a statement to the Washington Free Beacon. ?We can?t keep asking those who have given so much to give that much more.?
    Read more: http://nation.foxnews.com/president-...#ixzz1zZhbpHKN
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    I thought I read it was changing for retirees and not active duty until 2015.

    According to the article I read retirees contributions haven't changed since 1996 which is way out of whack for what we as civilians see. I believe it's also putting an enrollment fee for tricare and I vaguely think additional payment to prescriptions. Since that changes yearly for me...never mind not having a change for the past 16 years I'm okay with this. Military is trying to budget so they don't close down bases. Nothing to do with "Obamacare"
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    Community Host wlillie's Avatar
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    They're trying to budget so they don't have to let people go. Retirees contributions just went up last year; they are raised just at the COLA. And "free" healthcare is why some people join the military and why quite a few of them stay in. We're not that family (blessed as mostly healthy) but for those who put in the time and are now being asked to pay, it sucks. and asking retirees to not only pay for Medicare part b, but also all these little fees most definitely has to do with ObamaCare. The cost of healthcare is going to skyrocket and they want to cover their asses now so when they can't afford to do as they promised long ago to these veterans who put in more than 20 years and for quite a few, their healthy, they can say it had to do with only the budget crisis instead of both. It's sad when our government is much more worried about illegal immigrants and people who refuse to help themselves getting quality healthcare and downplay the affect those issues have on the people who did what they were supposed to do and served their country to boot.

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    Many people join civilian work forces with the same idea. Low cost/free bens and things change. Why should the military be exempt?
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    Posting Addict GloriaInTX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jessica1980 View Post
    Many people join civilian work forces with the same idea. Low cost/free bens and things change. Why should the military be exempt?
    Do you really think a civilian job compares to military service?
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    Personally, I'd like to see military and their families receive free healthcare. I think it is the least we can offer them for their sacrifices.

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    Community Host wlillie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jessica1980 View Post
    Many people join civilian work forces with the same idea. Low cost/free bens and things change. Why should the military be exempt?
    I, (NAME), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.

    You say that and you have to live by it for a minimum of 8 years. Even if you know it means you are more than likely going to be separated from your family, be injured, and/or die. All for whatever Congress decides to pay you. You don't get to quit. You don't get to find another job. You don't get to say no. In exchange for those actions, you get "free" healthcare, a paycheck, and an education. Take even one of those options away, and for most military, it is not beneficial (besides emotionally) to say that pledge again/say it in the first place.

    My dh is easily worth 6 figures as a civilian and despite that, we're both going to try to retire (for more reasons than this one, but it's the only one that's relevant); he had cancer and we don't want to deal with the expense of the testing/possibility of the cancer coming back. If we both spend 20 years (or just one of us) giving up the 6 figures for the (I think) 34,000 (only the taxable amount) he makes in the Air Force, don't you think it's ****ty to ask him to deal with the same things a civilian who actually received the 6 figures does? Do you really think a civilian job is in any way shape or form comparable?

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    Yes for the most part I think everyone should be treated comparatively. If FD and PD have to pay more into their ins and they put their lives on the line just as much as many military.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wlillie View Post
    I, (NAME), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.

    You say that and you have to live by it for a minimum of 8 years. Even if you know it means you are more than likely going to be separated from your family, be injured, and/or die. All for whatever Congress decides to pay you. You don't get to quit. You don't get to find another job. You don't get to say no. In exchange for those actions, you get "free" healthcare, a paycheck, and an education. Take even one of those options away, and for most military, it is not beneficial (besides emotionally) to say that pledge again/say it in the first place.

    My dh is easily worth 6 figures as a civilian and despite that, we're both going to try to retire (for more reasons than this one, but it's the only one that's relevant); he had cancer and we don't want to deal with the expense of the testing/possibility of the cancer coming back. If we both spend 20 years (or just one of us) giving up the 6 figures for the (I think) 34,000 (only the taxable amount) he makes in the Air Force, don't you think it's ****ty to ask him to deal with the same things a civilian who actually received the 6 figures does? Do you really think a civilian job is in any way shape or form comparable?
    unless you are being drafted..accepting that and joining the military is your choice. You are not forced to do anything of the above.
    Mom to E and C

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    Posting Addict Spacers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wlillie View Post
    I, (NAME), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.

    You say that and you have to live by it for a minimum of 8 years. Even if you know it means you are more than likely going to be separated from your family, be injured, and/or die. All for whatever Congress decides to pay you. You don't get to quit. You don't get to find another job. You don't get to say no. In exchange for those actions, you get "free" healthcare, a paycheck, and an education. Take even one of those options away, and for most military, it is not beneficial (besides emotionally) to say that pledge again/say it in the first place.

    My dh is easily worth 6 figures as a civilian and despite that, we're both going to try to retire (for more reasons than this one, but it's the only one that's relevant); he had cancer and we don't want to deal with the expense of the testing/possibility of the cancer coming back. If we both spend 20 years (or just one of us) giving up the 6 figures for the (I think) 34,000 (only the taxable amount) he makes in the Air Force, don't you think it's ****ty to ask him to deal with the same things a civilian who actually received the 6 figures does? Do you really think a civilian job is in any way shape or form comparable?


    The military isn't a job; it's your life. If my boss tells me to go work in Southern California for two weeks, I can say no (and have!) or I can negotiate them flying me home for the weekend to see my kids or I can say screw this & find a new job that doesn't require travel. When my BIL's boss told him to go live & fight in Iraq for two years without his family, he went, and when my nephew's boss told him to go live & fight in Afghanistan for a year, he went. If they hadn't, they would have probably gone to prison for quite a long time for not upholding their oath.
    David Letterman is retiring. Such great memories of watching him over the past thirty-two years!

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