Speaking against homosexuality - Crimes against Humanity? - Page 2
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Thread: Speaking against homosexuality - Crimes against Humanity?

  1. #11
    Posting Addict Rivergallery's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alissa_Sal View Post
    I would be interested to know how influential he was in helping to draft the death penalty law in Uganda. I also don't know what the laws are in Uganda regarding free speech, freedom of religion, et cetera. I do think that if you go to another country and break their laws then you should face their courts, regardless of whether or not what you did would be legal in the US. US law, as far as I know, only protects you for acts committed on US soil.

    I just don't know enough about the laws in Uganda or what he did while there to say whether or not this lawsuit is appropriate or if anything will come of it.
    1- He wasn't, and as far as I read he doesn't agree with everything in the bill.
    2- The Bill no longer contains the death penalty as far as I know.
    3- I agree about breaking the laws of another country, but as I can tell he didn't. They have had punishment for homosexuality for a long time.
    4- Not sure Americans should be held liable for civil lawsuits in other countries... Something to think about.
    DH-Aug 30th 1997 Josiah - 6/3/02 Isaac 7/31/03

  2. #12
    Community Host wlillie's Avatar
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    I don't think anyone should be tried for a crime they committed in another country in civil court here. I can't see how one person could have made enough of a difference in their country to have it called crimes against humanity. Was Uganda gay friendly before 2009?

  3. #13
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    no it wasn't.
    DH-Aug 30th 1997 Josiah - 6/3/02 Isaac 7/31/03

  4. #14
    Community Host Alissa_Sal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wlillie View Post
    I don't think anyone should be tried for a crime they committed in another country in civil court here. I can't see how one person could have made enough of a difference in their country to have it called crimes against humanity. Was Uganda gay friendly before 2009?
    Apparently the law that allows this is called the Alien Torte Statute.

    The Alien Tort Statute (ATS) is a U.S. federal law first adopted in 1789 that gives the federal courts jurisdiction to hear lawsuits filed by non-U.S. citizens for torts committed in violation of international law. When the ATS was drafted in the 18th century, international law dealt primarily with regulating diplomatic relations between States and outlawing crimes such as piracy, however international law in the 21st century has expanded to include the protection of human rights. In the 60 years from the signing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948 to the present decade, universal human rights have moved from being an aspirational concept to a legal reality. This remarkable evolution gave the ATS renewed significance in the late 20th century. Today, the Alien Tort Statute gives survivors of egregious human rights abuses, wherever committed, the right to sue the perpetrators in the United States.

    Since 1980, the ATS has been used successfully in cases involving torture, state-sponsored sexual violence, extrajudicial killing, crimes against humanity, war crimes and arbitrary detention. The Torture Victim Protection Act (TVPA), passed in 1991 and signed into law by President George H.W. Bush in 1992, gives similar rights to U.S. citizens and non-citizens alike to bring claims for torture and extrajudicial killing committed in foreign countries.
    CJA?The Alien Tort Statute

    Having said that, if all he did was go to Uganda and preach the usual anti-gay rhetoric that we typically see here and he didn't have anything to do with writing the Kill the Gays Law, I think he's a bad man, but I don't think that they have a case against him.

    ETA: Don't know why the confused smiley popped up in my link. LOL
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  5. #15
    Mega Poster mom3girls's Avatar
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    I wonder if the group knows the lawsuit will not gain traction, but are seeking to shed light on what was said by that pastor while in Uganda?
    Lisa
    Molly, Morgan, Mia and Carson

  6. #16
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    I am not sure I understand all of the details of the case enough to answer, but I did want to share something that was on my FB wall this AM. One of my FB friends from college lives in France.

    "800,000 people came out for the demonstration against gay marriage in France. The largest demonstration in France in 30 years. Praying the government listens."

    Just to say that it is not an American only thing. (Not saying how I personally feel on the issue as my feelings are largely undecided in this issue, but that I did not want it to be portrayed that only Americans would do such a thing.)

    ~Bonita~

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mom3girls View Post
    I wonder if the group knows the lawsuit will not gain traction, but are seeking to shed light on what was said by that pastor while in Uganda?

    This makes sense to me. He seems like a pretty hateful man and its always gratifying to see hatred outed and light shined on darkness........ but the lawsuit itself probably won't be successful.

  8. #18
    Community Host wlillie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alissa_Sal View Post
    Apparently the law that allows this is called the Alien Torte Statute.



    CJA?The Alien Tort Statute

    Having said that, if all he did was go to Uganda and preach the usual anti-gay rhetoric that we typically see here and he didn't have anything to do with writing the Kill the Gays Law, I think he's a bad man, but I don't think that they have a case against him.

    ETA: Don't know why the confused smiley popped up in my link. LOL
    That's good to know. Wow. I wonder how it works if the country the crime was committed in doesn't consider the action a crime.

  9. #19
    Posting Addict Spacers's Avatar
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    Everyone has a right to their own beliefs. Everyone has a right to express their own opinions about things. Everyone has the right to spew hatred about gays if they choose. But no one has the right to advocate violence against anyone else, not even when it's done in the name of religion. The other person's right to safety, privacy, freedom, etc. supercedes your right to say what you think. I don't know if this lawsuit will go anywhere but it did the job it was most likely intended to do, which is bring light to the situation in Uganda.
    boilermaker and Jessica80 like this.
    The number of U.S. states in which a person can marry the person they love regardless of gender: 30 and counting!

  10. #20
    Posting Addict Rivergallery's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacers View Post
    Everyone has a right to their own beliefs. Everyone has a right to express their own opinions about things. Everyone has the right to spew hatred about gays if they choose. But no one has the right to advocate violence against anyone else, not even when it's done in the name of religion. The other person's right to safety, privacy, freedom, etc. supercedes your right to say what you think. I don't know if this lawsuit will go anywhere but it did the job it was most likely intended to do, which is bring light to the situation in Uganda.
    I understand what you are saying. But I disagree, on the face of it it feels nicer to say one can't insight violence against another person or groups of persons.. But we do it all the time, and I think it should be legal. We should be allowed to be pro-death penalty, and discuss it, and promote it if we want. We should be allowed to discuss war our enemies, killing them and promoting it if we want to. So thus if we don't wan the government telling us who we should view as our enemies, then we should be allowed to insight violence.. trick is the carrying it out is the legal part, I think saying something or feeling something should not be nearly as legistlated as it is, and especially not as legislated as the action.
    DH-Aug 30th 1997 Josiah - 6/3/02 Isaac 7/31/03

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