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Thread: Teen Pregnancy Shaming in NY ads

  1. #21
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    I think it's also targeting the crowd that just thinks it won't happen to them. I think it has to be dramatic to have an impact. I don't know if it's effective, but I'd be curious to find out.
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  2. #22
    Posting Addict Alissa_Sal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimPossible View Post
    I get that making people feel bad sucks and can have bad consequences, but i get kinda of frustrated with this 'Teach kids about contraception!!!, Get kids birth control!!!" (Imagine it said in a high pitched idealistic happy voice)

    We spend SOOOO MUCH time focusing on this already. I feel like this is what we are constantly trying and it doesn't work! Or at least it doesnt' work fully effectively on its own.

    Its just like the fat shaimging thread. "Teach about nutrition! Teach about healthy eating!" We DO that a lot...the government has spent money on programs that are supposed to do this. Again, it doesnt' seem to work on its own.

    What if a teenager doesn't have a parent around that reminds them of the actual consequences of having a baby or remind them how friggin expensive children are?

    This "not talking about the consequences because some people suffer from those consequences at the present time and will feel bad about it" thing is starting to irk me.

    I get that we don't want to make people feel like failures or terrible people or whatever else...but I think we need to find a balance. Putting these statistics in the fine print on the back of a brochure isn't reaching anyone. Maybe focusing on the consequences of your actions is actually pretty essential in changing someones behavior.
    Kim, I get what you're saying, and I do agree that we need to talk about the consequences of poor decisions because it's important that people understand the risks. Maybe I'm just hung up on the word "shaming?" I don't know, I connect "shaming" with intentionally making people feel bad, and that's the part that bothers me. Like, it's one thing to present factual information about the risks of a given action, and it's another to specifically try to make someone feel bad about themselves for taking a specific action.
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  3. #23
    Posting Addict ClairesMommy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alissa_Sal View Post
    Kim, I get what you're saying, and I do agree that we need to talk about the consequences of poor decisions because it's important that people understand the risks. Maybe I'm just hung up on the word "shaming?" I don't know, I connect "shaming" with intentionally making people feel bad, and that's the part that bothers me. Like, it's one thing to present factual information about the risks of a given action, and it's another to specifically try to make someone feel bad about themselves for taking a specific action.
    I agree with this. I think that making teen/young parents feel bad about their poor decision making was incidental to the ad campaign. They were targeting the youth yet to get pregnant, trying to make them think twice and make better judgment calls, it's just that a whole bunch of other young parents were made to feel like $hit along the way. They're the ones shamed, not the group the campaign is targeting.

  4. #24
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    I was 20 when I had Jace and those kind of ads hurt my feelings and I could see it hurting other actual teen parents' feelings too. Instead of shaming, offer advice as to how their child can be prevented from becoming a statistic. But it's always easier to just shame someone or just offer the quick, "Oh I'll pray for you." Gee, thanks.
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  5. #25
    Posting Addict Rivergallery's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mommytoMR.FACE View Post
    I was 20 when I had Jace and those kind of ads hurt my feelings and I could see it hurting other actual teen parents' feelings too. Instead of shaming, offer advice as to how their child can be prevented from becoming a statistic. But it's always easier to just shame someone or just offer the quick, "Oh I'll pray for you." Gee, thanks.
    I agree with you on this one.. and I for one am so grateful to teenmoms that keep the child .
    DH-Aug 30th 1997 Josiah - 6/3/02 Isaac 7/31/03

  6. #26
    Posting Addict KimPossible's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ftmom View Post
    I see the shaming more in how these posters are done, than in the message they are sending. Why not have a picture of a young mother and her baby, with a quote from her along the lines of 'My baby daddy and I broke up, now I am trying to raise my baby on my own and finish school.' Then add your states around the father sticking around. Having the message come from real teen mothers seems more like educating and less like talking down to anyone. More of a girlfriend to girlfriend, 'I love my baby, but this is HARD and I wouldnt recommend it' kind of vibe.
    Yeah, less shock value/head turning. Too many words. I dont' really disagree with you...it would need to be tweaked to be eye catching enough IMO.
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  7. #27
    Posting Addict KimPossible's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alissa_Sal View Post
    Kim, I get what you're saying, and I do agree that we need to talk about the consequences of poor decisions because it's important that people understand the risks. Maybe I'm just hung up on the word "shaming?" I don't know, I connect "shaming" with intentionally making people feel bad, and that's the part that bothers me. Like, it's one thing to present factual information about the risks of a given action, and it's another to specifically try to make someone feel bad about themselves for taking a specific action.
    I understand, but like Kyla said, if you have a subest of teenagers who glorify it...i do think you need to stigmatize it. If its glorified, then no one is going to attentively listen to some statistics to find out why they shouldn't. Glorification of that sort is a cultural thing, you need to change that glorifcation and make it the opposite of glorious. I don't know how you do that mildly.

    Same with those who don't think it will happen to them. I do think you need to scare them. Its your last ditch hope on someone who thinks they are (almost) invincible.

    Do I feel bad that some people will get hurt feelings? yes, i would get no enjoyment out of that. But if it in turn means a generation from now there are less feelings to get hurt about the situation, seems like it would be a move in the right direction.

    I could see wording some of them differently. Like the "I'm twice as likely to not graduate high school because you had me as a teen" Maybe it could have send "If you have me" to not sounds as accusatory.

    But really the big baby faces, the personalization by making it come from a baby...which usually tugs at us emotionally. I feel like it could be really effective.

    And really, those teen moms who feel hurt by this or previously teen moms who are now adults....would they really object to it if they found out it was helping? I guess some always would...but I think a lot, wouldn't. ETA: I have a hard time picturing someone saying "Well okay it may be working, but it hurts my feelings"

  8. #28
    Prolific Poster ftmom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimPossible View Post
    Yeah, less shock value/head turning. Too many words. I dont' really disagree with you...it would need to be tweaked to be eye catching enough IMO.
    Well theres a reason I dont work in advertizing I just think it could be friendlier and still send the same message.
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  9. #29
    Mega Poster mom3girls's Avatar
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    I have a niece that I would love to slap up side the head with these ads. She really doesnt think parenting would be that hard, and that her and boyfriend of the week would be just fine parents. Never mind that she is in college full time and hasnt ever really had a real job, and boyfriend of the week (Ian I think) works part time as the shirtless guy at abercrombie. All she can talk about is how fun babies are, babies are so cute, babies smell good, I cant wait to dress my baby and pick a nursery out for my baby. It really drives me crazy. My sister sent her here last summer for a month to "help" me, I think it helped a little. But a 2 year old and a 5 year old are really fun. And when you are not the one paying for them it is even more fun.

    Not sure how many girls this will help, and I do feel bad if teen moms do feel shame. But this might be bold enough to really make people think
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  10. #30
    Posting Addict Alissa_Sal's Avatar
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    I guess I'm not overly convinced that social stigma will actually reduce the teen pregnancy rate, tbh. If you look at the states that have the highest teen pregnancy rates, they tend to also be the most religious states, where presumably there already IS a big stigma against pre-marital sex, and the messages that these kids are probably getting both at home and in church, and in their abstinence only school sex Ed is "don't do it!!!" I figure if all of that stigma doesn't stop the kids, a public shaming campaign probably won't either.
    -Alissa, mom to Tristan (5) and Reid (the baby!)

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