Is there an obligation to check your email?

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KimPossible's picture
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Is there an obligation to check your email?

Scenario:

You sign your kid up for a sport/activity and when you fill out the information, you provide an email address. Coach then initiates contact with his team about first practice, first game etc via email. You don't check your email and you call the sports organizer to say that you have had no contact from your child's coach about anything. You are informed that the coach sent out an email and you respond with "Oh, i never check that account"

Do you think we have reached a day and age where if you provide an email address, you should be expected to check it for communications? Or is it reasonable to still expect people to call everyone in case people *don't* read their email? Should organizers in this type of situation still have to consider that some people don't like communicating this way.

I am talking about people who provide email addresses. Obviously if none is provided, the coach would be aware and should make an effort to find a way to contact that individual.

GloriaInTX's picture
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It is pretty silly to provide your email if you don't expect to be contacted in that way.

elleon17's picture
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I don't think you can expect it especially if it is something of a timely matter.

I can't check my personal email at work and if I didn't have a smart phone it might be a week before I check that account.

If email is supposed to be expected the main form of contact, parents must be made aware of that.

IMO, sms messaging would be more effective.

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"elleon17" wrote:

I don't think you can expect it especially if it is something of a timely matter.

I can't check my personal email at work and if I didn't have a smart phone it might be a week before I check that account.

If email is supposed to be expected the main form of contact, parents must be made aware of that.

IMO, sms messaging would be more effective.

Why would someone ask for an email address when they don't plan on using it? If someone has a email address that is impossible to check regularly (which also is becoming fewer and more far between) then they shouldn't provide it as a means of communication, anymore so than i would provide a phone number that i can't be reached at the majority of the time.

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When I signed DS up for hockey, they specifically said I would be getting an email at the end of August with info for the season, so I will keep an eye out.

If you (general) don't check your email regularly, then you shouldn't provide an email address, just in case that is going to be the main method of communication.

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"kris_w" wrote:

If you (general) don't check your email regularly, then I wouldn't provide an email address, just in case that is going to be the main method of communication.

See while I"m not quite there yet, I'm *almost* at a point where i thik if you have an email address, you should use it and check it for these things. I know old habits die hard but i think its becoming more a sign of the times and its rather inconvenient to make the organizational leader/coaches/etc. go through ttime of using different methods for different people in order to round them all up, just because you don't feel like working 'checking your email' into your daily routine. If you can have an email address and check it....then you should. If its impossible for you to do so? Then i think its fine to expect to be reached a different way. I think email has been around for long enough that its okay to be expected to be reached that way aside from extenuating circumstances.

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Yes, as a part of the world in 2012 you must check your email on a regular (daily) basis, and if you don't I believe that you should have an auto reply providing either another email address or a phone number and letting people know that you are ignoring their attempts to contact you/provide you with information.

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At sign-up, I'd expect them to tell me that email would be the primary way of communication so that I'd know to check it.....otherwise, I'd expect a phone call or snail mail.

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"boilermaker" wrote:

At sign-up, I'd expect them to tell me that email would be the primary way of communication so that I'd know to check it.....otherwise, I'd expect a phone call or snail mail.

Really? You would expect a phone call or snail mail before an email?

I can't think of a single sport my kids have played since we've begun where initial contact from the coach for practice times and other information was made any other way besides email. Preference was never indicated by the parents, nor by the coach. This is spread amongst several different organizations in two different states.

Not saying its wrong one way or the other...just surprises me that people still think of email as some sort of 'other' form of communication, that needs special verablizatoin in order to use.

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We are on base; everyone has a miltiary email address so are expected to check it daily if not hourly. We had one guy who deployed during soccer season and provided no contact information for his wife and she was highly upset she missed a practice because she didn't get the email (hubby didn't have her email). Dude knew he was deploying, he should have 1. had an out of office 2. told his wife that practices were on Wednesdays at 5:30 3. given her email address or 4. Not put his down at all.

I think you should only put contact information down that you check on a regular basis.

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In the world of email, the open rate for emails is 15%. It is actually a dying form of communication.

If I need to get an email M-F, I put my work email down (which is against company policy), but I do not have regular access to that on the weekends.

Many people may have access to email on their phones, etc, but their work may have a zero tolerance to checking it at work on the computer or phone.

I just don't think it is as reliable as some think. I would want to know what the primary form of contact is so I can be prepared for that.

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"elleon17" wrote:

In the world of email, the open rate for emails is 15%. It is actually a dying form of communication.

If I need to get an email M-F, I put my work email down (which is against company policy), but I do not have regular access to that on the weekends.

Many people may have access to email on their phones, etc, but their work may have a zero tolerance to checking it at work on the computer or phone.

I just don't think it is as reliable as some think. I would want to know what the primary form of contact is so I can be prepared for that.

How many out of that 85% that aren't opened are junk email? My guess is 100%

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"elleon17" wrote:

It is actually a dying form of communication.

Could not disagree more strongly with this.

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"GloriaInTX" wrote:

How many out of that 85% that aren't opened are junk email? My guess is 100%

Actually the rate I am quoting might be what is considered 'junk mail', but most 'junk mail' is because you applied your email to an application, card, etc. I work with a lot of Direct mail marketing. Nowadays putting my email on something like that has just as much likelihood as anything else.

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Is your argument that email is dying based on that statistic? That statistic only tells me that we only open what is important to us and we get a lot of unimportant stuff(aka spam) I'd like to see a statistic that showed people use individual phone calls for group information or snail mail...and that email is losing to those, I think your argument would be more pertinent.

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"elleon17" wrote:

Actually the rate I am quoting might be what is considered 'junk mail', but most 'junk mail' is because you applied your email to an application, card, etc. I work with a lot of Direct mail marketing. Nowadays putting my email on something like that has just as much likelihood as anything else.

Okay..but so what? Why does that mean you shouldn't expect people to try to reach you via an email address you provide to them?

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"wlillie" wrote:

I think you should only put contact information down that you check on a regular basis.

This. We have 13 girls on our soccer team and there's no way I could (or would want to) call every parent to remind them about practice, or to let them know when & where the game is, or what to bring. We have one girl whose mom doesn't have access to email on weekends. She told me that at the very beginning. I know if I need to notify her about anything after 2pm on Friday, I need to call her, but for regular notifications, email is fine. We use a Photobucket team site that automatically sends emails about things I've entered on the calendar; parents can also log on at their convenience & check the calendar, too. I'd love if Photobucket would send texts if the person enters a phone number instead of email, but it's not that sophisticated. Yet.

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I do check my email daily and more often if I am expecting something. I would like to be told the preferred way they will send info especially if they are also asking for home address and home and/or cell phone. My daughter's teacher will email with us but has both a web page and sends home items more frequently so I wouldn't think to check my email for something going on in class tomorrow.

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For our sports' leagues that we are involved in the organizational side -- we rely a great deal on email as an important means of communications. We stress as a part of the registration process to confirm that it is correct due to the # of communications we send out that way. Among those things that we send out via email to parents: receipt for registration, seasonal game schedules, field closures for practices/games due to rain, make up games, seasonal volunteer notes, discounts for gear (pre-season); early registration discounts (for the following season); uniform notes; newsletters; and more.

We use email for coaches to send them their rosters and parent contact information. They again are to verify that info with parents and it is then their responsibility to personally call / text (whatever is preferred by parent) for those that state that they do not check email. In our coaches' meeting, for those reaching out to parents the first time, we advise they include a note asking for a response and sharing that those that they do not hear back from will receive a phone call.

When doing surveys of parents, most have shared that they prefer receiving the emails vs. a phone call. Since we are a 100% volunteer organization it definitely is a time-saver for coaches, parents, and the board members. Having it via email it also allows for fewer communication mistakes re: practice or game days/times. It also was noted to give parents a note to reference in case they got busy and forgot what their child needed, when/where practices were, etc.

I can say though that for one league we did determine to add text message alerts as well for those that wish to sign up but that is limited in capabilities for what type of messages we can send. (For example, mass sending game schedules that way would be horrible. LOL)

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"Spacers" wrote:

This. We have 13 girls on our soccer team and there's no way I could (or would want to) call every parent to remind them about practice, or to let them know when & where the game is, or what to bring. We have one girl whose mom doesn't have access to email on weekends. She told me that at the very beginning. I know if I need to notify her about anything after 2pm on Friday, I need to call her, but for regular notifications, email is fine. We use a Photobucket team site that automatically sends emails about things I've entered on the calendar; parents can also log on at their convenience & check the calendar, too. I'd love if Photobucket would send texts if the person enters a phone number instead of email, but it's not that sophisticated. Yet.

A lot of people don't seem to know this but you can use email to send texts and each major phone service provider has an email domain so that you can send and email to [email]phonenumber@emaildomain.com[/email] and the user will receive it as a text. So [email]123456789@tmobil.com[/email] for example (that's not the right domain I don't know what it is irl)

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"KimPossible" wrote:

A lot of people don't seem to know this but you can use email to send texts and each major phone service provider has an email domain so that you can send and email to [EMAIL=phonenumber@emaildomain.com]phonenumber@emaildomain.com[/EMAIL] and the user will receive it as a text. So [EMAIL=123456789@tmobil.com]123456789@tmobil.com[/EMAIL] for example (that's not the right domain I don't know what it is irl)

That's good to know! Count me in the "lot of people" who didn't this!

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I have a regular non internet cell phone. I send texts to e-mail all the time. It is how I get my pictures off my phone. Text to my e-mail. I also text a friend that does not have a cell phone to her e-mail if it is important. You can also text from Gmail.

I would think the sign up form would have a place for how to be contacted, but if you put your e-mail address it would be expected that you check it on a regular basis. As for not getting junk mail to your regular e-mail, I have a separate e-mail address that I put down for things that I think will be junk mail.

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"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

I would think the sign up form would have a place for how to be contacted, but if you put your e-mail address it would be expected that you check it on a regular basis.

See I think the organization should be able to choose the primary contact method and if it absolutely cannot work, the potential recipient can speak up and say "I have no email and no way to access email". I think its highly inconvenient for organizers to let parents (or whoever) to choose which method they prefer to be contacted by.

in this day and age, if you have an email address, you should use it. If not for things that you initiate, at least for things that other people initiate, when they choose to.

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I honestly couldn't imagine not checking my email at least a few times a day. It's how teachers, coaches and such contact us for just about everything. I definitely prefer it, since I have whatever info I need in writing and can go back and check it at any time.

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I don't have a smart phone and often don't get to my email daily. I can not have tons of personal correspondence sent to my work email. I prefer to deal with the phone for passing messages on, and with a organisation I am with we still send paper notes home to parents rather than email. I would be annoyed if the only way someone would communicate is email. I don't plan on getting any form of data plan for my phone hbecause for me it is a waste of money so I will not have the contactable by email 24/7 thing that so many people have happening.

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It seems kind of silly to include an email address and then say you don't check that account. Why include it then?? I check my email multiple times a day (rather... my computer is on all day and my email program is open so if I walk past and see there's a "new message" icon, I check it). There are times that when filling out forms I do not include it, but if I do include it, then I would naturally assume there's a very good chance they may email me... and I would make sure to check for them. I do (finally) have a cell phone but it's just a regular one and I do not (cannot for all I know) have any kind of web/email access on it and I am OK with that!

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why do people keep saying they don't have a smart phone and thats why they can't use email?

If the message is "Hi everyone, Practice is going to be on Fridays at 6:15"

you don't need a smartphone to get this message. You just need to check your email, via a computer...once a day.

Of course it doesn't work for items that you need to know within the hour. But within 24 hours? Or a week? Absolutely.

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No smartphone here either. I still check my personal email when I wake up and when I get home from work and if I'm not busy, I check it at work a few times too. When I didn't have access to a computer (moving or not having the internet or a business trip) I didn't put my email address down as a way of contacting me.

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If you provide an email address as a form of communication, than it is up to you to check it on a regular basis. I check mine several times a day, I can't imagine NOT checking my email really. Why even provide an email if you don't use it? In this scenario, on a sports team, I can totally see why an email is an important form of communication - the coaches simply don't have time to track each parent down via phone or regular mail especially if it's a regular communication ie: schedule each week/month.

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"KimPossible" wrote:

See I think the organization should be able to choose the primary contact method and if it absolutely cannot work, the potential recipient can speak up and say "I have no email and no way to access email". I think its highly inconvenient for organizers to let parents (or whoever) to choose which method they prefer to be contacted by.

in this day and age, if you have an email address, you should use it. If not for things that you initiate, at least for things that other people initiate, when they choose to.

I agree Coaches in my experience are volunteers and parents should make their job as easy as possible. Who wants to go through and make 20 phone calls every time a practice is canceled or a game rescheduled?