Yahoo's new woman CEO

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GloriaInTX's picture
Joined: 07/29/08
Posts: 4116
Yahoo's new woman CEO

Does she set a bad example for other working women by planning to return to work in a few weeks after birth and working from home?

The news that Yahoo knowingly chose a pregnant woman as its new CEO has rightly been heralded by working women and their allies as another hole in the glass ceiling. Marissa Mayer, until now a top executive at Google, reports that when she told Yahoo's board of directors that she and her husband are expecting their first child in October, no one expressed any second thoughts about hiring her. The lack of reaction "showed their evolved thinking," she said.

But Mayer's next sentence immediately squashed any illusions that her presence at Yahoo foreshadows any change in corporate America's 24/7 work culture. "My maternity leave," she told reporters, "will be a few weeks long, and I'll work throughout it."

Mayer's assurance that having a child will require so little adjustment in her work schedule has led many women to worry that she is naive about the physical and emotional price she will pay for taking so little time to recuperate and bond with her new baby. Others express concern that her child will suffer for her decision.

But Mayer's insistence that she will get back to work so quickly sets a bad precedent for Yahoo's lower-level employees, mothers and fathers, who do not have the job flexibility and cannot afford the extensive social support and backup systems that Mayer and her husband will be able to construct.

Ellen Galinsky, president of the Families and Work Institute, argues that the personal work-life choices of top leaders in a workplace are as important as their formal work-life programs and policies in shaping expectations about what is and is not acceptable. Leaders who take little time off for family create a work culture that inhibits lower-level employees from asking for any work-family rearrangements they may need.

It's great that corporate leaders no longer assume a high-powered female employee will lose her brain, drive and work commitment when she gets pregnant. And I admire Mayer for feeling free to set a high priority upon her work commitments without succumbing to the guilt that weighs down so many working moms. But it might be better for the rest of us working parents, who don't have the same resources and support systems, if she would take a longer leave and maintain a dignified silence about just how many work hours she puts in during it.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/07/18/opinion/coontz-yahoo-marissa-mayer/index.html?hpt=hp_c2

Joined: 05/23/12
Posts: 680

Why should she be judged for her choice? because she chose to go back to work early instead of staying home longer? Yes there are some women who have to go back to work earlier than they'd like out of necessity so if someone gripes about it I call sour grapes.

Everyone has different circumstances and we have to live in our reality which are different between a clerk and a CEO. So does the amount of education, experience, and hardwork. Sounds kind of callous maybe but perhaps people can look at it positively in that if one has to go back to work then it can be done and there is success story so far.

It would not be my choice but who cares. We can celebrate choices overall - even if I don't get or make all the same as everyone. And I do hope YAHOO has a good maternity plan just as any company should.

GloriaInTX's picture
Joined: 07/29/08
Posts: 4116

I think it is silly to blame her for her own choices. Everyone has a choice about what kind of job they do. If she is willing to sacrifice time with her baby to be a CEO than more power to her. I don't see why that should affect someone else that wants to take a little more time off. I don't think that sets an expectation that every Yahoo employee will have to return to work in a few weeks. I wouldn't want to do it, but I wouldn't want to be a CEO either for that same reason. That's probably why they hired her, because they knew the kind of commitment she had to her job. This reminds me of when people were complaining when Sarah Palin was running for Vice President that she wouldn't have time for her special needs baby. No matter what you do someone is going to think you are doing it the wrong way.

Joined: 04/12/03
Posts: 1686

WTH? So what if she wants to return within a few weeks? That's her choice. I wasn't cleared until closer to 8 or 9 weeks to return to work.

I don't think it sets a bad example at all. However the advice I would give all soon-to-be parents is to take as much time off as possible after their baby is born. I've never met anyone who said, "I wish I had spent less time with my child when he/she was born."

Joined: 08/17/04
Posts: 2226

I wouldn't go back soon but I had a friend who *HAD* to return to work 4 weeks post partum for the pay check so she's not the first person to go back to work early.

What one person does with their maternity leave should not change what others do.

And clearly, women are still expected to stay home since this thread was titled "Yahoo's new woman CEO" Wink

AlyssaEimers's picture
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6560

I think she can say right now she will be right back to work, but who knows what will happen afterwards. It is up to her what she does though. Many self employed people do not get much of a maternity leave at all.

Joined: 05/23/12
Posts: 680

"AlyssaEimers" wrote:

I think she can say right now she will be right back to work, but who knows what will happen afterwards. It is up to her what she does though. Many self employed people do not get much of a maternity leave at all.

When my mom had us, she was back to work after 3 days because otherwise we'd have had no food. She worked was a waitress and after one of her shifts she had me. And there was no concept of insurance at least in her reach back then.

Joined: 07/16/12
Posts: 8

I went back to work the day after I was discharged from the hospital with my son. Being a single mom who lived with her mother at the time, I really had no choice. Different strokes for different folks.

mom3girls's picture
Joined: 01/09/07
Posts: 1535

I have no issues with her choices, wouldnt work for me I could have just stared at my babies for 12 weeks if possible. I do hope that as a woman she can support other woman that dont make the same choices she does. I would hate for woman that are in her field or company to feel they had to return to work right away if they wanted to climb the corporate ladder.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3187

"GloriaInTX" wrote:

I think it is silly to blame her for her own choices. Everyone has a choice about what kind of job they do. If she is willing to sacrifice time with her baby to be a CEO than more power to her. I don't see why that should affect someone else that wants to take a little more time off. I don't think that sets an expectation that every Yahoo employee will have to return to work in a few weeks. I wouldn't want to do it, but I wouldn't want to be a CEO either for that same reason. That's probably why they hired her, because they knew the kind of commitment she had to her job. This reminds me of when people were complaining when Sarah Palin was running for Vice President that she wouldn't have time for her special needs baby. No matter what you do someone is going to think you are doing it the wrong way.

This exactly. Yahoo is a HUGE company and to run it you have to be the type to make your job a top priority. Feminism is about choices, whether it's spending more time at home or more time at work. She wouldn't have gotten the job if she wasn't focused on work and she's not responsible for other people's options or choices.

ClairesMommy's picture
Joined: 08/15/06
Posts: 2299

It is always very surprising to me how soon you girls to the south have to return to work. Sad

That aside, she's clearly a driven woman who has worked very hard to get where she is. Finding the balance between demanding, high-profile career and motherhood is probably going to be a challenge. It is for any woman and I don't imagine it will be much different for her.

Joined: 05/23/12
Posts: 680

I agree with you. I don't agree with her choices at all, but I am happy that she was able to choose. I am happy that she was chosen despite her personal circumstances because I think 'that' makes a big statement about how candidates should be hired. And for a career minded woman, she may have thought that it's not everyday that a job like being Yahoo's CEO becomes available and she'll work it out somehow because perhaps she believes in the long run her hard work will pay off.

"Claire'sMommy" wrote:

It is always very surprising to me how soon you girls to the south have to return to work. Sad

That aside, she's clearly a driven woman who has worked very hard to get where she is. Finding the balance between demanding, high-profile career and motherhood is probably going to be a challenge. It is for any woman and I don't imagine it will be much different for her.

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3312

"freddieflounder101" wrote:

This exactly. Yahoo is a HUGE company and to run it you have to be the type to make your job a top priority. Feminism is about choices, whether it's spending more time at home or more time at work. She wouldn't have gotten the job if she wasn't focused on work and she's not responsible for other people's options or choices.

I struggle with this. I think there are pitfalls and downsides to the fact that she plans on returning to work so soon and it has been so widely publicized. I do think the decision is detrimental to pushing our society to embrace a work/life balance better. It sends the message that to be successful you have to not balance.

But the reason why i struggle with this is because the way society is right now, that probably *is* true, especially for women. So for her to achieve what she has wanted to achieve, those are probably the kinds of choices she has had to make.

But how does society change to be more accepting of work/life balance, particularly when it comes to child rearing? Especially when those few women who hold positions of power have the ability to influence our outlook, but choose not to. Or maybe we don't feel like it real does need to change. Maybe as a whole, we are okay as a society saying "look, if you want to make it to the top, you shouldn't be taking a long maternity leave"

I don't know....either way i don't think she is obligated to consider the social ramifications of this decision and make that her priority. But I won't sit idly by and say it doesn't send any bad messages about what women need to do to be respected in the business world.

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3312

I should also add that as a full time working mother who has had to tell her boss 5 times(not all at the same company) that I was going to have a baby and go on maternity leave and who felt stressed out doing so....i think i would even be mores stressed out about having to make these decisions if i was an employee at yahoo now...or maybe even in general.

What i really wish is that no one had said anything about her maternity leave choices and that it wasn't news.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3187

I agree that I would have liked it best of all if no one had said anything about it.

That said...I long ago accepted that I simply cannot "have it all". My brother and I were talking about it and he feels the exact same way, this is no longer specific to women. If you want to be at home with your kids on a regular basis in the evenings AND have a career, you usually have to accept the fact that the people who don't have kids and can put in longer hours will get ahead more quickly. I have made many sacrifices career-wise for my kids and I feel that is a choice I made. I don't blame the company I work for; for the most part the VPs are the ones going that extra mile (or at least did that to get promoted) in a way that I simply can't commit to while my kids are still at home.

There's a high powered exec at Facebook who has come out publicly to tell the world how she leaves by 6:00 every day....so both messages are out there. I read a million articles about the Yahoo CEO and this is the first one that talked about maternity leave, but I'm in the same industry so perhaps I was reading more inside-industry articles.

My brother is in the same boat as me. He wants to be home with his kids (now 8, 13, and 18 ) in the evenings so he can't compete with the people who don't have kids. He says you can't have it "all", but I think I sort of can, because I still have a career AND I go home to the kids every day at a reasonable hour. But am I moving up aggressively? No. But to me, maybe this is "all" until I myself am ready to take the next steps. When I was single I worked my *** off all night, stayed late and didn't mind it, and had great upward career movement.

I still say that there's a HUGE difference between working at Yahoo and being the CEO of Yahoo. It has been that way at every company I've worked. People don't have the same expectations of someone making 1/4 of a CEO's salary.

Joined: 08/17/04
Posts: 2226

I agree with Laurie. You can't have it all and she is opting to be a CEO at yahoo and making concessions at home for that. Like Laurie, I have made concessions at my job. I work from home which is awesome but my job is less than spectacular. I could move up and take a higher position but that is in office, every day, 40+ minutes away and right now being at home is the better choice for me and my family. I love that I have that choice. Not having a choice is where the problems are.

ClairesMommy's picture
Joined: 08/15/06
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I think "all" is a subjective term. What's all to me is likely not all to the next woman and I agree with Laurie that expectations range widely based on socio-economic status and personal preference, among many contributing factors. That aside, it's entirely possible that she will have her baby and a major paradigm shift at the same time. Becoming a first-time mother changed me forever. My priorities were completely different and my career took a major backseat to doing the job of parenting right.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3187

I also want to add that company culture is a big part of this. I went from working at companies with mostly younger people who didn't have kids, where everyone was expected to stay late and put in crazy hours, to the one I'm in now where well over 50% of the people have families and understand that there are priorities in life that are important as well. I am dealing with my mother's illness right now and my bosses have gone above & beyond to support me and make it clear that I should do what I need to do and that will mean taking more time off than I have in the "bank" (so to speak) or sometimes having to step away to collect myself. Of course I still have to do my job and do it well, and I don't let things slip, but the people I work for are my age or older and understand that LIFE is a full, rich, rounded experience.

I have a friend who worked on an awful now-canceled tv show and they thought nothing of having everyone work from 8:00 a.m. until 10:00 p.m. or later every single night. (And no, nobody gets overtime.) It meant nothing to them.

So company culture is huge. I have no idea what it's like at Yahoo. But I still wouldn't make one person's decision for herself bear with it the responsibility for others.

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3312

"freddieflounder101" wrote:

I agree that I would have liked it best of all if no one had said anything about it.

That said...I long ago accepted that I simply cannot "have it all". My brother and I were talking about it and he feels the exact same way, this is no longer specific to women.

I disagree, i think it stands more in the way of women and their success than it does men. It has changed some, but I still consider this a women's problem primarily. I think we are merely at the beginnings of change when it comes to the role men play in parenting and household life. This is coming from a woman who's husband chose to be a stay at home dad for several years.

If you want to be at home with your kids on a regular basis in the evenings AND have a career, you usually have to accept the fact that the people who don't have kids and can put in longer hours will get ahead more quickly. I have made many sacrifices career-wise for my kids and I feel that is a choice I made. I don't blame the company I work for; for the most part the VPs are the ones going that extra mile (or at least did that to get promoted) in a way that I simply can't commit to while my kids are still at home.

For the most part i agree with you, but i want to try to get my beliefs across about work and home life without being misunderstood. I think in general there are changes a lot of companies could make to promote a better balance of work and home life, a balance that would not be detrimental to their company's workforce and would potentially benefit it by having happier employees. I think women in particular bear more of the the burden related to a lack of this balance more than men do. I think ANY emphasis on these values that comes from higher up the chain has a positive influence on work culture and double income living and i think any emphasis on the more traditional routes to success dont help. Like i said, no obligation to her to do what helps (which is why i wish it kind of just flew under the radar as a whole)

There's a high powered exec at Facebook who has come out publicly to tell the world how she leaves by 6:00 every day....so both messages are out there. I read a million articles about the Yahoo CEO and this is the first one that talked about maternity leave, but I'm in the same industry so perhaps I was reading more inside-industry articles.

I've actually read a couple that reference it. And the first thing one of my QA analyst friends said to me, a computer programmer (she is also a mom with many kids) "Did you see she's not taking a maternity leave?" And i don't think the 'opposite message' is there with a strong presenece, considering that message has an uphill battle and the other message is already well established, one facebook exec doesnt' make a huge difference.

My brother is in the same boat as me. He wants to be home with his kids (now 8, 13, and 18 ) in the evenings so he can't compete with the people who don't have kids. He says you can't have it "all", but I think I sort of can, because I still have a career AND I go home to the kids every day at a reasonable hour. But am I moving up aggressively? No. But to me, maybe this is "all" until I myself am ready to take the next steps. When I was single I worked my *** off all night, stayed late and didn't mind it, and had great upward career movement.

I agree with the concept that you need to sacrifice somewhere in order to do what you need to do for your family. That being said, i think there is a lot of improvements that could be made in many industries that could make this easier. And I think a message of 'maternity leave is expendible' just isn't a great one.

I still say that there's a HUGE difference between working at Yahoo and being the CEO of Yahoo. It has been that way at every company I've worked. People don't have the same expectations of someone making 1/4 of a CEO's salary.

While the expecations are definitely going to be different, i have never felt like takeing a good maternity leave was encouraged at my very 'non executive' level. I think its looked at as an extra burden that comes along with hiring women in particular. I see it different than the issue of going home at 6 every day, because one speaks of your proffessional output as a whole, vs a temporary haitus, which does not speak to your proffessional output as a whole. I do understand her situation is unique because she is in a particularly high pressure situation to save a sinking ship and the birth of her child and career switch are probably poorly timed for that.

I think my issue is that maternity leave should simply be valued more in our society and this was a good opoprtunity to re-inforce that. I'm not even one of those people who thinks we need a year off....but i think our maternity leave policies in the US shoudl still be better than they are now. I think an executive who works her butt off and has made a lot of sacrifices for her career success taking a maternity leave would be a great message and wouldn't hurt her career.

This is one of those things that i don't think is an end all and be all of a bigger problem. I'm simply observing what i think are true consequences of her choice, even if it was hers to make. I don't think she should be bashed for her choice....but i dont' think that means its wrong to point out what i see as 'cons' to the situation too.

Joined: 03/08/03
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I hear you, Kim, but I think that companies have no reason to really encourage work-life balance. They'd rather people just worked, for the most part! I mean, it depends on the company and the type of person they want to attract. The company I am at now wants people to come here and stay here long term, so they are pro work-life balance. Yahoo is probably aggressively seeking out the fastest and brightest and most aggressive, so they would have different goals.

I agree about the message except that as a newly-minted CEO of Yahoo it would indeed hurt her career to take maternity leave. My career, not so much.

Spacers's picture
Joined: 12/29/03
Posts: 4100

What's missing from this discussion is Ms. Mayer's husband. He's pretty much self-employed, being a venture fund capitalist & co-founder of a shared workspace company & on various boards of various entities. He could very well be planning to be a hands-on parent. I know from experience (twice) that it's not very hard at all to walk out the door to go to work when you know that your spouse & life partner is going to be the one caring for you child & you know that your child will be very well cared for by someone who loves him.

zefroim's picture
Joined: 05/18/06
Posts: 126

The comments made by Ellen Galinsky are assinine. This woman should not return to work within a few weeks, because it may make lower level employees feel bad? Ridiculous. If she wants to return to work, then she has every right to and I see nothing wrong with it if that is what she wants.

Joined: 05/23/12
Posts: 680

"Spacers" wrote:

What's missing from this discussion is Ms. Mayer's husband. He's pretty much self-employed, being a venture fund capitalist & co-founder of a shared workspace company & on various boards of various entities. He could very well be planning to be a hands-on parent. I know from experience (twice) that it's not very hard at all to walk out the door to go to work when you know that your spouse & life partner is going to be the one caring for you child & you know that your child will be very well cared for by someone who loves him.

This is right... who exactly are we to sit on the sidelines and say, "And what role do you plan to play in child rearing and availability?" Who do we think we are?

Her personal life is her personal life and we shouldn't personally care what she plans to do to raise her child. Yahoo's only interest in her is a professional one. Her child rearing and care arrangements just like every other woman's is only a concern when it starts interfering with her ability to perform according to expectations.

So we should not be talking about who's going to do what.. it's her life..her choices.

I'm beginning to think the best day will be when something like this happens and no one notices.

ange84's picture
Joined: 12/28/09
Posts: 6564

Not only company culture, but each office culture. At the last office i was at ( i still do the same job just different location nlw) we had a bunch of new people start who all started getting to work early and leaving late and slowly slowly the older members of staff in the office started doing the same and it became the normal office culture.

Regarding the CEO it's her choice how she wants to run her work life balance, her individual circumstances might have her husband being a sahd who will relish the role, it may be baby goes to a nanny 24/7, or any other various scenarios we don't know. I know a lady who returned to work just a few weeks after having her bub, but her employers lets her take bub with her, she has a cot and all set up in her office and works with this arrangement until they get too mobile and distracting

Alissa_Sal's picture
Joined: 06/29/06
Posts: 6427

Am I the only one who thinks that having the ability to work from home as needed (since it noted that she will be working from home) is a great improvement in the work/life balance for working moms? I don't care when she goes back to work (and I agree that being the CEO of Yahoo means that she has to be a very dedicated and hardworking individual anyway), I'm happy for her that she can do if from home. Hire a nanny, hang out with kiddo in between calls. Not a bad way to do it.

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3312

"Alissa_Sal" wrote:

Am I the only one who thinks that having the ability to work from home as needed (since it noted that she will be working from home) is a great improvement in the work/life balance for working moms? I don't care when she goes back to work (and I agree that being the CEO of Yahoo means that she has to be a very dedicated and hardworking individual anyway), I'm happy for her that she can do if from home. Hire a nanny, hang out with kiddo in between calls. Not a bad way to do it.

I work from home, from a motherhood standpoint i don't see it as a great advantage. Work time is work time and with the kids home its difficult. I still had to choose to send the younger ones to daycare and my older three have a sitter for the summer. I find that trying to get them to understand it is work time for me is very hard, even with the sitter. Its natural for them to want to come and ask questions or tell me things throughout the day. Its hard for them to understand that me hanging out with them on my terms during work is different than them coming to me on their terms...and I feel like a jerk turning them away. I have often tried to tell them they have to think of it like I'm not here and I'm in an office like Daddy is. I appreciate the working from home for other reasons though, as it gave me the ability to move to Maine, and i can really work from anywhere if need be.

What i will tell you is fantastic from a working parent perspective is the flexible schedule. I get out at 2:30 every day and make up the extra time in the evening one or two nights a week. Its given me the ability to sign my kids up for after school activities that i couldn't take them to otherwise. Its a blessing and a curse because i find myself feeling like i should work more often than i probably need too, only because it is possible to work any hour of the day. But its more of a blessing than not.

I really do love the idea of a flexible schedule for those careers it actually is feasible for. If i don't want to miss an important event, i don't have to worry so much about being gone in the AM and making up the time later. I love having so much control over how i balance my work and home life, instead of someone telling me i need to be there between 8 and 5.

ETA: I will agree that to have the ability to work from home on occasion, when its needed is great. Many of my co-workers take advantage of this. If their child is home sick from school for a day, they can work from home, if the weather is really bad or there is a snow day, they can work from home. While you can't be quite as productive with the kids home while working, my office is very understanding of it happening once in a while as long as you are responsible about getting your stuff done.

Alissa_Sal's picture
Joined: 06/29/06
Posts: 6427

Kim, I agree that when you work from home your children still need childcare (particularly if you are going to do it every day instead of just every once in a while when they're sick) and that a flexible schedule is a huge blessing to working parents. I guess I just feel like, in terms of being around, at least working from home would probably still allow her to breastfeed and whatnot. Even if someone like a nanny is providing the bulk of the care, I always pictured working from home involving a bit more interaction with the child during the day than if you're actually physically separated from them. That could be an idealized picture though, since I only get to work from home a couple of days a month.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3187

I don't think you can be a CEO and effectively work from home, though. That job doesn't lend itself to being away from the office. If the company allowed it a good solution would be having an empty office next door with a nanny and the baby, so she could nurse, visit, etc., but it also might make things weird at the office.

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3312

Yeah i just think when we start thinking of interacting with our children during work it becomes problematic. Obviously I'm very pro life/work balance but anything that involves mixing the two simultaneously i think ultimately doesn't work very well. When you are doing both at once....even if you are doing one of them only a little bit, you aren't doing either as well as you could be.

I think its even harder for younger children who can't understand why they shouldn't be bothering their parent, yet they are aware that the parent is there.

Listening to your newborn scream and having to ignore, listening to your toddler scream or cry after they have fallen and having to ignore it, listening to your older kids fight and having to ignore it is stressful and distracting, even if you have a caretaker you trust. Actually choosing to respond to it is definitely problematic. For most jobs you need long stretches without distraction, so if you can force yourself to not interact with your family except for on your break or lunch, then you're golden. Or if you are made of steel and can easily not react to what is going on with your children it could work.

I think it can be done, but i don't think it can be done if the intention is to interact more with your kids.

I think about breastfeeding. If i was home when any of my children were newborns i know there would be times that I would want to go and feed the baby because they are screaming and discontent and i know it would quiet them and make them happy. Maybe they only ate an hour ago, but they are fussing and i could calm them down....and then i would want to go lay them down carefully because i know transferring the baby from my hands to the sitters would make it that more likely for them to wake up again.

...yeah it would be a nightmare of stress.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3187

I agree, Kim. I work from home occasionally and when Juliet was very little, I'd hear her negotiating with our nanny...."can I just go LOOK at Mommy?" It was really hard for them.

My husband works from home a lot but he goes down to the basement to work, and we always have someone here with the kids.

AlyssaEimers's picture
Joined: 08/22/06
Posts: 6560

On working from home, it would depend on what kind of a job it was as so how much you can interact with your kids. For example, if you had a home daycare or were babysitting for money then you would still be spending lots of time with your own kids. Before my MIL retired she was a visiting nurse. She would do the paper work at home. As she would work, she would still spend time with people and do other things. She then worked extra in the evenings after the kids were asleep.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3187

Exactly. Running a daycare, you're with the kids. CEO of Yahoo, not so much.

KimPossible's picture
Joined: 05/24/06
Posts: 3312

Right. I was commenting more on the idea of a full time office type job where you have the option to do it from home...telecommuting specifically which is definitely a different scenario than an in home daycare...or a job that has *some* paperwork but is primarily done in another setting.

You wouldn't believe how many people think I watch the kids and work from home when I tell them I telecommute or just seem to have unrealistic ideas of what telecommuting is like. I'm just trying to offer a different perspective.

Not saying its a bad option to have....just to be clear.

Joined: 03/08/03
Posts: 3187

Kim, my husband has the same problem. He works from home a lot, and his dad will call him in the middle of the day and say, "So you're home? What are you doing?"

Um...working. Like he does every week from Monday to Friday. His family doesn't really get it. He writes software, there's no way he could do his job and watch the kids at the same time.

Alissa_Sal's picture
Joined: 06/29/06
Posts: 6427

Agree that running a daycare from home and being a CEO aren't really comparable when it comes to being there with the kids.

However, I do agree that it depends on the type of job. As I said, I work from home about twice a month, and usually try to use that for when T is sick or we don't have a babysitter for whatever reason. The only time it's problematic is when I'm on a call and he is trying to get my attention. But for the most part, my job involves answering a crap ton of emails and sometimes creating some reports and spreadsheets. Most of it can be done while multi-tasking. I can understand that it would be harder with a job that needed more uninterupted concentration, or more calls (which is what I see happening with the CEO.)