My Garden Update! **ADDED PICS!**
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Thread: My Garden Update! **ADDED PICS!**

  1. #1
    Site Moderator girlisrad's Avatar
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    Default My Garden Update! **ADDED PICS!**

    here we go!! Things are moving along finally! i replanted a lot of the pallet garden, and in just a few days life was sprouting!!! Please don't judge on my weeds HAHAH! I haven't got out there yet this week!

    The garden! Back sad little plants are the punkins, and the watermelons trying to grow. Middle is the squash (zuchinni) and the front are the maters


    Shot of the blossoms on one of the squash plants. I am going to be up to my EARS when these things start growing!


    One of may baby Romas... I actually pulled a red one yesterday and ate it! DELICIOUS!


    Baby watermelons. I honestly thought they were a loss. But with extra water and TLC they are going and growing! Might have some fall melons LOL


    green onions! I had these planted before I left and they never grew. I replanted, and WOOP! I think my neighbor just did not water as often as she let on!


    Baby Parsley! I did not mess with this after I got home. I just kept watering thiking, MAYBE? and YES! It came up finally! again. lol.. water!


    This is my second go of radishes! Oh they grow so fast, and are just DELICIOUS. The heat just makes them so dang good! The kids spilled the rest of my seeds, so I will go and buy a few more packs and just keep planting until they wont let me anymore LOL!


    This is my Brussel sprout plant! And beside (underneath) it is my basil. I am rather proud of this LOL! But I admit the way sprouts grow just gives me the creeps!


    FOR COMPARISON: This is what it looked like the end of May before I left!! What a change!



    thanks for looking!




    Welp, after a 2 week vacation my plants did pretty good! My neighbor did her best, but there were a few things that were negectled.

    I lost strawberries and bell peppers and the giant cabbage and the lavender... they all died.

    My green onions never popped at all!! And I lost a few herbs too...

    Tomatoes, squashes, pumpkins, radishes and brussel sprouts are going gangbusters! I might even have a bumper crop this next month LOL!

    Watermelons are TRYING so hard to go, but they just don't wanna get bigger :/ I am keeping everything crossed.

    And, finally... I have 3 heads of lettuce out of 3 rows planted. The Spinach never popped, but I planted that directly before I left so there might still be a small chance that something will go!

    And that's it! I am having camera drama right now and I am a bit leary of taking pics. When I get a few more answers then I will be brave and post some for y'all!!!

    YAY!!!

    I should be around more regular like!
    Last edited by girlisrad; 07-03-2012 at 06:24 PM.
    I'm back, baby.

  2. #2
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    Yay! You are back. I hope you had a nice vacation.

    ~Bonita~

  3. #3
    Community Host sarahsunshine's Avatar
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    Sorry you had losses in your veggie garden.

    Did you not get any rain while you were gone?

    We're having trouble with powdery mildew on our pumpkin, but hope it's been caught in time before it spreads to the zucchinis (yes, plural!)
    Skyler Dylan 22 April 1999
    Reed Aslan 17 June 2007 ~ 8 September 2008
    Ivy Rayne 3 May 2009
    Leo Spencer 2 Sept 2010
    Forrest Reed 15 Aug 2012


  4. #4
    Site Moderator girlisrad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarahsunshine View Post
    Sorry you had losses in your veggie garden.

    Did you not get any rain while you were gone?

    We're having trouble with powdery mildew on our pumpkin, but hope it's been caught in time before it spreads to the zucchinis (yes, plural!)

    Ah, no... no rain at all. Other than a few thunderstorms we have not had rain in MONTHS. It is a very severe drought here. I am actually having to SOAK (read: flood) my garden in the AM, and give it a spray in the evening just to keep up. Its pretty bad! BUT< the extra effort has paid off and the plants are doing wonderful! I eve replanted radishes and some more herbs and lettuce too!!! the little buds on the squash plants are PLENTIFUL! So we will get a late, but hopefully good harvest

    Sorry about your pumpkins! I wonder what that stuff is?

  5. #5
    Community Host sarahsunshine's Avatar
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    Do you use much mulch for your plants? How about watering in the evening when it cools and less evaporation takes place. Many times that will help prevent water evaporation, and keep the roots moist. Adding some compost to the soil also helps hold moisture and add nutrients.

    Powdery mildew is a fungus (I think) that spreads on many plants, particularly in the squash family. Basically you have to burn it to get rid of it it seems, unless you use a bunch of store- bought fungicide. I don't like that approach on veggies that I'm going to eat, and furthermore it kills the good soil fungi necessary to keep the plants as healthy as possible. Instead, I've taken al the infected leaves off (most of them), and am using a compost tea to increase the good bacteria in the soil and help strengthen the plant to be able to fight off whatever fungus is left. It's been only 3 days, but so far so good...
    Skyler Dylan 22 April 1999
    Reed Aslan 17 June 2007 ~ 8 September 2008
    Ivy Rayne 3 May 2009
    Leo Spencer 2 Sept 2010
    Forrest Reed 15 Aug 2012


  6. #6
    Posting Addict gardenbug's Avatar
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    Powdery mildew is a problem with clematis (my addiction!) When it rears its ugly head, I follow this advice below. Notice it suggests NOT watering at night. I use #2 occasionally, the oil spray. Lately though, I avoid plants that are susceptible to PM!

    Conditions for disease development

    The disease is favoured by warm, humid, conditions but is discouraged by rainy weather. It is prominent in localities where there is little air movement, where plants are grown in the shade and where high night humidity occurs. Powdery mildew outbreaks can, however, vary from season to season without there being obvious differences in the weather.
    Control Methods
    Provide conditions which do not favour the development of the disease. Ensure there is sufficient air movement and try to avoid watering in the evening to prevent humidity build-up. Remove and destroy all infected plant material in the autumn.
    Under garden conditions, the disease can be kept under control by a well-managed fungicide spray programme. Start spraying known susceptible cultivars early in the season before symptoms appear. For northern Europe this would be round about May. If you know from past experience when the very first symptoms appear, then start spraying 3 weeks before this. Follow label recommendations but a total of three sprays applied at 2-3 weekly intervals should be sufficient to keep the disease under control. If not, then continue spraying longer and shorten the interval to 2 weeks.
    Fungicides which are effective against powdery mildew can be broadly placed into 4 groups:

    1. Sulphur: Sprays will leave a visible spray deposit on the plants and if applied in hot weather, may cause burning of the foliage. Not liable to resistance development.
    2. Oil-based sprays e.g. ‘Sunspray’: Should not be used in combination with sulphur sprays. Not liable to resistance development.
    3. Products containing the active ingredients fenarimol, myclobutanil, triadimefon, tebuconazole, flutriafol, tebuconazole, penconazole: No more than 3 consecutive sprays of products in this group should be applied so as to prevent resistance.
    4. Products containing the active ingredients azoxystrobin, trifloxystrobin, kresoxim-methyl: No more than 3 consecutive sprays of products in this group should be applied.
    When using fungicides for the first time, it is always wise to check that the sprays do not cause leaf scorching or other adverse effects on some cultivars.

    Text ?2007 Paul Margot
    Leo (3 1/2) with Malcolm the cat

  7. #7
    Community Host sarahsunshine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gardenbug View Post
    Powdery mildew is a problem with clematis (my addiction!) When it rears its ugly head, I follow this advice below. Notice it suggests NOT watering at night. I use #2 occasionally, the oil spray. Lately though, I avoid plants that are susceptible to PM!

    Conditions for disease development

    The disease is favoured by warm, humid, conditions but is discouraged by rainy weather. It is prominent in localities where there is little air movement, where plants are grown in the shade and where high night humidity occurs. Powdery mildew outbreaks can, however, vary from season to season without there being obvious differences in the weather.
    Control Methods
    Provide conditions which do not favour the development of the disease. Ensure there is sufficient air movement and try to avoid watering in the evening to prevent humidity build-up. Remove and destroy all infected plant material in the autumn.
    Under garden conditions, the disease can be kept under control by a well-managed fungicide spray programme. Start spraying known susceptible cultivars early in the season before symptoms appear. For northern Europe this would be round about May. If you know from past experience when the very first symptoms appear, then start spraying 3 weeks before this. Follow label recommendations but a total of three sprays applied at 2-3 weekly intervals should be sufficient to keep the disease under control. If not, then continue spraying longer and shorten the interval to 2 weeks.
    Fungicides which are effective against powdery mildew can be broadly placed into 4 groups:

    1. Sulphur: Sprays will leave a visible spray deposit on the plants and if applied in hot weather, may cause burning of the foliage. Not liable to resistance development.
    2. Oil-based sprays e.g. ‘Sunspray’: Should not be used in combination with sulphur sprays. Not liable to resistance development.
    3. Products containing the active ingredients fenarimol, myclobutanil, triadimefon, tebuconazole, flutriafol, tebuconazole, penconazole: No more than 3 consecutive sprays of products in this group should be applied so as to prevent resistance.
    4. Products containing the active ingredients azoxystrobin, trifloxystrobin, kresoxim-methyl: No more than 3 consecutive sprays of products in this group should be applied.
    When using fungicides for the first time, it is always wise to check that the sprays do not cause leaf scorching or other adverse effects on some cultivars.

    Text ?2007 Paul Margot
    Yes, I've found that... My problem is that I bought the plant from a greenhouse and it had the powdery mildew (I noticed when I got home). It's in a hot, dry area with lots of breeze - so not what is typical for powdery mildew, and it hasn't (yet) spread to other plants. I've removed all the infected leaves and all the new ones that have grown over the past week seem to be clear (and it's growing very fast and strong).

    As well, the way that many people seem to be using is to increase the good bacteria that can fight the fungus - and those are in worm compost, and can be made into a "compost tea" which can be sprayed on the plant.
    Skyler Dylan 22 April 1999
    Reed Aslan 17 June 2007 ~ 8 September 2008
    Ivy Rayne 3 May 2009
    Leo Spencer 2 Sept 2010
    Forrest Reed 15 Aug 2012


  8. #8
    Posting Addict tink9702's Avatar
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    Glad to hear your garden is picking up!
    ~~Mel

    Ethan - June 21, 2009
    Olivia - December 5, 2010
    5w3d - October/November 2012

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  9. #9
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    Yay for a growing garden! Boo for disease.

    ~Bonita~

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    Posting Addict Jules's Avatar
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    Looks happy! I'm so glad you had a garden to come home to...and that it's threatening you with a bumper crop later this summer.

    I really need to wander out and take a few pictures of my porch garden. Because we're house hunting, I haven't put much in the ground. Container gardening has become my new learning experience.

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