OT question - toddler non-verbal still at 2 yrs

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raingirl28's picture
Joined: 09/03/07
Posts: 1347
OT question - toddler non-verbal still at 2 yrs

Question for you all as I believe most of you already have kids. My nephew is 2 yrs old in 2 weeks and he is completely non-verbal. Not even sounds that we can't understand, no sounds at all. He just points at everything. He understands everything though and when he cries he makes noise, so I don't think it's a hearing issue.

The parents don't seem concerned at all. I personally would at least ask someone professional about it if it were me. But they also don't do much early education. They don't read to him or anything like that really.

On a side note, I've noticed ever since he was little that he has a lot of autistic tendencies. He's very OCD about things (if a door is open, he freaks until someone closes it. Same with things (i.e. spills or messes or keys, etc) on the ground, he will whine and point at it until someone picks it up.

They used to live in a small town of 500 people but just moved close to us. Should I gently mention to them they may want to have it investigated?

mom2robbie's picture
Joined: 01/20/07
Posts: 2541

:lurk:
what Robbie's doctor told us with regards to autism if they are walking before talking it is a cause for concern. With Robbie he was talking way before he was walking (he has gross motor delays and didn't walk until he was 21 months) and he is being diagnosed with high-functioning autism.

As to mentioning it, that is a hard one. Some parents take great offence to the idea of someone else making "negative" comments about their children. They should be taking him for his 2 year check up and the doctor should be able to notice that he is not speaking. Maybe ask if they have his appointment set for his check up? If they just moved they may need to find a doctor and need your assistance finding one.

raingirl28's picture
Joined: 09/03/07
Posts: 1347

Well, after SIL and family left yesterday we were talking with DH's parents. Apparently they've been concerned for a while but SIL refuses to address it. I just looked up the common signs/symptoms of autism and he has at least 5 or 6 of the red flags. I just hope when they find a new paediatrician here that he/she notices something is wrong and suggests some sort of evaluation.

indianajones's picture
Joined: 01/21/07
Posts: 1486

He'd be a great candidate for something like First Steps- it's not like what my impression of THERAPY (read in a scary voice) was when I was a kid. Kids don't have to be at a certain level (high or low) for them to evaluate, either. I think it is definitely worth a referral and initial visit. If a pediatrician is worth his/her salt, he/she will make a referral at that 2 year appointment!

Joined: 11/23/07
Posts: 870

do they never have well-child visits? our Dr checked things like that, my daughter has always been on the tail end developmentally of every scale, but the Dr made sure she was on it. and i got her in to Early head start so they could help me keep an eye on her. she wasnt walking at 18 months. BECAUSE SHE IS A STUBBORN SPOILED LITTLE BRAT... not because she couldnt. i realized that later on. when she stood up and walked at 20 months, she NEVER tripped. she just waited to be good at it before she did it. children should use at least 6 words consistantly at 18 months. a 2 yr old who doesnt do that concerns me.

raingirl28's picture
Joined: 09/03/07
Posts: 1347

My experience with their small town doctor is that he's a general physician, in his 60s, and probably doesn't notice these things. But I only saw him once when I ran out of my Asthma meds while on vacation visiting DH's family.

pico83's picture
Joined: 09/06/06
Posts: 3009

:lurk:
we ended up having DS1 assessed at age 2. He was taking part is a baby study and they were really concerned. He was a little verbal, but mostly just repeated things he had heard rather than constructing anything novel. His play was a little bizarre. He didn't do imaginative play and he was shy, so he avoided eye contact with most adults.
To make a long story short, he was fine when assessed and now is doing really well and has an amazing vocab. It was super scary to take the step of seeking an assessment, but I'm so glad we did. And, the state we lived in then had a program where anyone (parent, relative, doctor, teacher, etc) could recommend a kid for assessment. The parents obviously had to approve it, but anyone could get the ball rolling.
I'd mention it if you get a good opportunity. Hopefully someone will get them to act on their concerns soon. My sister is a speech pathologist and she has told me how much easier it is to make progress if the child gets help at a younger age. And if he is actually fine, then they'll finally be able to relax and stop worrying!