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Thread: Breastfeeding/Pumping support

  1. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by toolgirl View Post
    I should also say that you should only keep BM in the fridge for 3 days......so freeze before that time period is up!
    My midwife told me to use this guideline for keeping breastmilk:

    6 hours at room temperature
    6 days in a fridge
    6 weeks in a freezer
    6 months in a deep freeze

  2. #152
    toolgirl
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    I think all the guidelines are a little different.....I was going by the ones on my breastmilk storage bags.....well poop, it is different than the box, but here it is

    Storing Milk

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    It is important to store your breastmilk in a place that is sanitary and safe. If you are pumping and storing your breastmilk at work in a common refrigerator, make sure you label it with your name or put it in a bag so it is not mistaken for regular milk.
    If you have any questions about proper storage of breastmilk, talk to your pediatrician, International Certified Lactation Consultant or follow the guidelines below from La Leche League International.
    Where TemperatureTime
    At room temperature (fresh milk)66° to 78°F
    (19° to 26°C)
    4 hours (ideal)
    up to 6 hours (acceptable)*
    (Some sources use 8 hours)
    In a refrigerator<39°F (<4°C)72 hours (ideal)
    up to 8 days (acceptable)**
    In a freezer-0.4° to -4°F
    (-18° to -20°C)
    6 months (ideal)
    up to 12 months (acceptable)
    * The preference is to refrigerate or chill milk right after it is expressed.
    ** Eight days is acceptable, ideally collected in a very clean, careful way.

    What Type of Container to Use

    Refrigerated or frozen milk may be stored in:Other storages tips:
    • Containers should not be filled to the top - leave an inch of space to allow the milk to expand as it freezes.
    • Disposable bottle liners are not recommended. With these, the risk of contamination is greater.
    • Bags are less durable and tend to leak, and some types of plastic may destroy nutrients in milk.
    • Mark the date on the storage container. Include your baby's name on the label if your baby is in a day care setting.
    • Keep frozen milk in the middle of the refrigerator away from the sides where the temperature can fluctuate.
    How to Warm the Milk
    • Thaw and/or heat under warm, running water.
    • Do not bring temperature of milk to boiling point.
    • Gently swirl milk before testing the temperature. Swirling will also redistribute the cream into the milk. (It is normal for stored milk to separate into a cream and milk layer.) Do not shake vigorously as it could damage some of the live components of breastmilk.
    • Do not use a microwave oven to heat breastmilk.
    Thawed Milk
    • Previously frozen milk that has been thawed can be kept in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours.
    • It should not be refrozen.
    Has Your Frozen Milk Gone Bad?

    In very rare cases, some mothers who have meticulously expressed and frozen their milk for later use have discovered to their dismay that all their frozen milk has turned rancid. This happens when a mother produces milk that is high in lipase, the enzyme that breaks down fat in the milk. Depending upon the level of lipase in her milk, some mothers notice this rancid smell after their milk has cooled in the refrigerator; others, notice it only after the milk has been frozen for a while. Thankfully this doesn't happen often, and this can be prevented if the lipase is detected before the milk is frozen.
    It is suggested that every mother who is planning to freeze her milk should freeze some test batches of milk and thaw it out after a week or so to be sure it has not become rancid. If it smells rancid, she may need to scald the milk before freezing in the future to deactivate the lipase in her milk. For more information, please see the Breastfeeding Answer Book published by La Leche League International.

  3. #153
    Prolific Poster jaders's Avatar
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    Toolgirl - I posted to the other thread as well, but the nurse at the Pedi's office said Tylenol was fine for fever and pain relief.
    Jade
    Wife to Jason 11.21.07
    Mum to an angel 5.16.08
    Our big Ellsabunny 8.8.09
    And the wee Eclair 1.30.11


  4. #154
    Hooch
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    I see you guys were talking about storage and freezing quantities. I had a good stash with DS and have a good one going now too since I'm pumping a lot (380oz in the chest freezer with probably another 20-30 in the kitchen freezer waiting to be double bagged and put out in the deep freeze. ITA with the PP who suggested freezing in smaller quantities, especially at first. My bags are mostly 2-6 oz bags. I like 2 oz bags because they are great for thawing and making homemade baby food (just don't freeze it since you're using thawed milk in it). Smaller quantities like that are just more flexible in general. FWIW, I've always followed the storage guidelines at kellymom.com.

    We've only gotten 1 BFing session in today. At least it was a good one.

  5. #155
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    One is more than zero. I say one feeding is a cause for celebration!!

    I just pumped the side I didn't feed Karah on....5 oz....from one boob! Holy....I guess she really did up my supply. No wonder it felt so full....poor boob...lol

  6. #156
    Prolific Poster jaders's Avatar
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    Well, I decided to give pumping at night a try...and it went better (though quite differently) than expected.

    I got her all settled and latched on for her 4am feeding before I realized I'd forgotten the pump (in my defense, it *was* 4am), so I asked DH to go grab it for me. He came back with it, and the next thing I know, he pulled down my top, stuffed my boob in it, and started pumping for me! He pumped the whole time she nursed and got 2.5 ounces - not bad for his first time - especially considering I seldom get more than 2.5-3.

    He thinks my pumping problems have more to do with my pump than anything else (he kept going on about rubberizing the joins to improve suction )... and he's willing to invest in a better one!

    So...which pumps do you recommend? Right now I'm using the Medela Harmony (single manual) which seems really inefficient.

    Also, how do you know what size shields you need if you have flat nipples? And while I'm asking... has anyone tried breast shells? Do they work?
    Jade
    Wife to Jason 11.21.07
    Mum to an angel 5.16.08
    Our big Ellsabunny 8.8.09
    And the wee Eclair 1.30.11


  7. #157
    toolgirl
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    Aw Jade....I see my first child with you ALL over again!! LOL!!

    I use the medila pump in style LOVE IT. I don't use specific horns for my flat nips, they suck them out!! I will tell you though, YOU CAN PUMP TO HARD! Believe me, I had AWLFUL experience and a phone call to the nurse on call cause it freaked me OUT!! I started pumping blood cause I was like, hmm, the more it sucks out, the faster this will go.....BAD IDEA!!! LOL!! I had visions of my child turning into a vampire!! I am sure I was the conversation topic for the nurse on call that night! So if you do get an electric one, I don't recommend immediately adjusting the suction to the highest setting....not the smartest idea I have had!!!

    Breast shells....you talking about those hard plastic things that the nurse told me to wear and that supposed to help pull my nipple out? I tried those and um, no, they did not help! Honestly, I think pumping helped the most!

  8. #158
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    I use the Medela Harmony pump and find that it's really efficient. I've always found that I get more milk with a manual than an electric....but that's just my experience. I can tell you that a cheap electric pump is not worth it....they're crap. I can also tell you that Medela products CAN'T be beat....they are simply the best and worth every penny you spend on them.

    That's really funny about DH doing the pumping....maybe I can convince DBF to do this for me instead of sleeping through feeding!

    I have no experience with Breast Shells.

  9. #159
    toolgirl
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    Do you know anyone (in real life) that has a breast pump? Like I had loaned my to my SIL, then one of my friends used it, now I am using it again. You can buy all new parts that actually touch you and the milk! So even buying one used (I can actually only go by the one I have used, the Medila PIS), but you can buy all new tubing and shields. The pump itself is just that, it is not like milk goes through it or anything. Just FYI.

    Also, check with your hospital, they sometimes rent them out! That way you can "try before you buy" so to speak. I did that with my first, to see if it was even possible for me to pump etc.....to see if I liked pumping, blah blah blah. So you could check there, so insurance even covers it if you go through there.

  10. #160
    Prolific Poster jaders's Avatar
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    Thanks!

    I need to talk to my SIL - I know she used a double electric, but I don't know what kind or whether she still has it. Using hers would be great!

    Otherwise, I think I'll look into the PIS - I keep hearing good things about it and it seems like what I want. (Though I will be careful about the suction levels thank you for the warning!)
    Jade
    Wife to Jason 11.21.07
    Mum to an angel 5.16.08
    Our big Ellsabunny 8.8.09
    And the wee Eclair 1.30.11


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