About to throw my camera away
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Thread: About to throw my camera away

  1. #1
    Posting Addict ChristianMommy's Avatar
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    Default About to throw my camera away

    Ok...Need help....As you ay know I have a Nikon D3000....does anyone have any comments on Nikon? Should I take this back and get the Canon Rebel? I am just so frustrated with the pictures....I have not purchased the 35mm lens yet, all I have is the 18-55mm lens. My daughter was in a pageant last night. Of course, all pics are underexposed as usual. Dark and no better than my digital point and shoot. Then I take some pics in stage lighting, overexposed. Then just a very well lit school hallway, and her face is blurred. Took some outside in the sunlight, overexposed. All this time my light meter says perfect exposure...I am to the point where I want to return it since I'm obviously not able to take any better pictures than I can with a disposable one.....Can't seem to NEVER get catchlights either...so sad

    ps, I didn't use any ss low enough to cause her face to be blurred either....
    Kevin and Alicia- Parents to Brianna, Madison (our Angel), Brandon, Christian, Noah, and Caydee Faith!

  2. #2
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    I know what the problem is .......Sorry your pics were ruined though.

    Ok you've changed the exposure comp.
    look at your +/- at the bottom, it should read 0 but chances are it doesn't. Change to A mode, on the d60 there is a +/- button, press and hold while turning the wheel you normally change ss
    LJ
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    Posting Addict AmberBella's Avatar
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    Wow, really? You have only had the camera for a few weeks. This is not the camera's fault...this is user error. Remember...it is not the camera that takes good pictures, it is the photographer. If I gave you the best violin in the world, that doesn't guarantee that you would make amazing music on it. By the same token, a cheap violin in the hands of a master could sound amazing.

    Catchlights have ZERO to do with the camera....there is a girl here who is using a point and shoot and has recently started getting amazing catchlights. She is learning her point and shoot and using it to its best advantage. Months ago, her images were a mess...now...she's getting really good quality.

    It takes time to learn this tool. I started with an Xti...and all my pictures were underexposed for months until I learned the idiosyncrasies of my camera.

    That said, these lower end DSLR's have their limits. You have to know how to work within those limits and use your tool to its best advantage.

    ETA: You also need to learn to understand lighting. What seems like a "well lit hallway" will likely never be enough lighting for a low end DSLR without flash. Our eyes adjust and make lighting seem equal....but it's not. On the other hand....stage lights are extremely harsh and complex. Very bright in some areas and really dark in others. It really encourages blown highlights and blown color channels. Using an automatic mode in that situation is out of the question...unless you're using flash at a close enough distance to make it matter. You need to know how to work the light using your camera as a tool. To figure out exposure, the camera interprets what it's looking at as 18% gray. The camera cannot POSSIBLY figure out 18% gray when looking at stage lighting. All it sees is black black black...so it will want you to over expose the image to try and make all that black gray. This is where the photographer comes in. You know what you are looking at, so when you have enough experience, you can set the camera to the appropriate setting to get usable images.
    Last edited by AmberBella; 02-21-2010 at 05:04 PM.
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    Posting Addict Amy_&_Eva's Avatar
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    I agree, you can't get this frustrated so early in the game. You've only been using these techniques (manual) for a short time. It's not the camera's fault. Like Amber said, the human eye (as I was just commenting about to my hubby the other day) balances and brings in light in low-light rooms better than probably any camera (generally speaking). You have to learn ALL the features and settings and when a pic doesn't come out right, stop and think what each thing is set at and what could possibly need adjusting.

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    Prolific Poster NicholeC's Avatar
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    I had bought the nikon d3000 and tried it for a few weeks and I didn't like it. To me it wasn't very user friendly so I took it back and got the canon rebel xs and I love it.
    Nichole & Brandon May 17, 2008
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  6. #6
    jendodd
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    I 100% agree with Amber. You can't just pick up a DSLR and expect it to take photos like a pro, when you've never had experience with a DSLR before.

    First off with your meter. Are you spot metering, centre weight? Every different option will make your meter read something different and you have to adjust your exposure based on that.

    There is NO way that you will exposed images on a stage without a flash, by handholding your camera. In order to do that, you have to move up to a professional D700 (at least). When I shoot stage shows with my D300, my ISO is jacked, on a tripod and I'm shooting with a remote.

    What's your aperture with the blurred images. SS isn't the only thing that will cause images to not appear in focus.

    Sit down, take a deep breath, grab a great beginners book and learn how to use the camera before throwing it away.

  7. #7
    sabby2
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    ditto!

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    Posting Addict ChristianMommy's Avatar
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    Thanks! I really think I am just not understanding exposure, lighting, DSLR cameras in general. I have been looking into classes but could only find tutorial DVD's by Nikon at relatively cheap prices. I understand that there are tons of different combos of ap and ss that will zero out my light meter and say it is perfect exposure, but I think the combo's I'm picking may not be the appropriate settings for the picture I am wanting. I know it will take time, but it seems the more I practice, the worse I'm getting. I wasn't saying it's my Nikon's fault...I know it's user error. But I was wondering if maybe the Canon Rebel would be easier for me to understand and learn.....I researched both for at least 6 months before choosing the Nikon, but now I'm second guessing my choice as far as ease of use goes. Thanks for all the comments.
    Kevin and Alicia- Parents to Brianna, Madison (our Angel), Brandon, Christian, Noah, and Caydee Faith!

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    Hi, I normally lurk here but had to pipe in and say I just bought my first DSLR this weekend, took it out of the box, set it on manual and snapped pictures that I was thrilled with... and I got a Rebel XSi. I think it's super easy to use and understand but I had another Canon before this and though it wasn't a DSLR, I was able to shoot in manual and for the past year and a half, I have been practicing at that before jumping into the DSLR world... So I don't know if it's my practice on my old camera or that the Rebel seems extremely user-friendly, but I've only had my Rebel for two days and it already feels like a long-lost friend.

    Tori 2005
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    Posting Addict AmberBella's Avatar
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    Canon and Nikon work the exact same way. Buttons are in different spots, but they do the same thing. It will most likely not be easier to start from the very beginning on a Canon vs Nikon.

    And to re-iterate my comment from above....zero-ing out your light meter isn't always the right choice.
    Last edited by AmberBella; 02-22-2010 at 03:30 AM.
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