What could I have done differently? Dark stage shot

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tialee80's picture
Joined: 02/04/12
Posts: 394
What could I have done differently? Dark stage shot

My seat was about 50 seats back. While the convention center was very dark, the stage lights were super bright white.
I don't have the camera and I am not sure how to get my settings on photobucket but I am pretty sure what I used.
ss 1/500 ap f 8-9 iso 400 to 800 Focal length around 70mm

I give these numbers because this was everything I tried. I also tried a SS of 1/250 to let in more light but it was too slow to stop the action. I know a tripod would have been better to use but I was in a seat that really did not make it possible. I also tried balancing my camera on the seat in front of me as well as changing my ap but I stuck with the ap noted to "try" to keep everyone in focus. I do not believe flash was allowed so I did not even try it.
My question is with my situation what could I have done differently? My daughter has one more preformance and I really want to get it right. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Photobucket

tialee80's picture
Joined: 02/04/12
Posts: 394

Even if these are the same things you would have tried I would appreciate knowing. I think it will make me feel better knowing I did all I could lol.

Joined: 01/18/06
Posts: 402

Cool shot! You could open up the aperture more and crank up the ISO if your camera allows. I probably would have used my 35 mm 1.8 lens for this type of shot because of the range of aperture settings it offers. Still, I find that really wide apertures produce less crisp images. All in all, I think your shot looks great considering you didn't use a tripod and had lighting issues.

Ladybugsteph's picture
Joined: 06/21/06
Posts: 2977

Janet gave you some good advice. The thing to remember with aperture is that the further back you get, the more in focus things will be. For example, if you're very close to someone and taking their picture with a wide open AP, it's possible to get one eye in focus, and the other out of focus. When you're as far back as you are here, even if you open up your AP more you will most likely still get everyone in focus since they're further away. So, open up your AP more, and crank that ISO up as high as you can. If you expose properly, there will be minimal grain, and what is left over can be taken out with Noiseware.

I really think you did a good job on these, though. Just a little tweaking and they'll be awesome Smile

tialee80's picture
Joined: 02/04/12
Posts: 394

"Quetzal1" wrote:

Cool shot! You could open up the aperture more and crank up the ISO if your camera allows. I probably would have used my 35 mm 1.8 lens for this type of shot because of the range of aperture settings it offers. Still, I find that really wide apertures produce less crisp images. All in all, I think your shot looks great considering you didn't use a tripod and had lighting issues.

I did try my 50mm1.8 but I could not get close enough. If you would have used your 35mm and then post cropped the image do you think the post crop would be more crisp than me zooming like I did? Just wondering cause next time maybe I will try my 50?

tialee80's picture
Joined: 02/04/12
Posts: 394

"Ladybugsteph" wrote:

Janet gave you some good advice. The thing to remember with aperture is that the further back you get, the more in focus things will be. For example, if you're very close to someone and taking their picture with a wide open AP, it's possible to get one eye in focus, and the other out of focus. When you're as far back as you are here, even if you open up your AP more you will most likely still get everyone in focus since they're further away. So, open up your AP more, and crank that ISO up as high as you can. If you expose properly, there will be minimal grain, and what is left over can be taken out with Noiseware.

I really think you did a good job on these, though. Just a little tweaking and they'll be awesome Smile

Thankyou I did not know that at all about . Good to know:)

Joined: 01/18/06
Posts: 402

Thanks for the tip, Stephanie. I shy away from open apertures because I've had closeups turn out soft, but I've never experimented with subjects that are far away.

Tialee, I think a zoom lens does help, but if you can't open the aperture wide enough, you've got to rely on a high ISO and/or slow shutter speed and a tripod. I like the fact that your photo is from a distance. It gives it a whole different impact than if it were of just one one or two performers.

tialee80's picture
Joined: 02/04/12
Posts: 394

Thanks:) On my way to get the 60D and then I will try again at the next competition using these tips:)