Unable to Breastfeed?

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SoniaNoemi138's picture
Joined: 01/24/11
Posts: 569
Unable to Breastfeed?

I've heard it mentioned before that some women are unable to breastfeed their babies. I was wondering what are some of the circumstances under which this would not be possible? Thanks and sorry for my ignorance.

Joined: 12/21/09
Posts: 344

Well for me, the pain was so incredibly painful. I couldn't take it. It was more painful that giving birth to him. I recently figured out I think he has a lip tie, which was likely the problem there.

Also, I have other health problems that may be contributing. I had like NO supply. I pumped for 5 1/2 months, and the most I ever got in a day was 13 ounces. It majorly sucked. I tried all supplements (sans Domperidome, which I refused to take), and none of them did anything for me. I pumped constantly, and it never helped.

I'm hoping I have better success this time - I want nothing more than to be able to nurse my babies. I am treating a thyroid issue at the moment, so that may help, seeing as how an out of whack thyroid can contribute to a lot of things.

Tongue and lip ties can be huge factors, but both are easily remedied by having the tie snipped. People have supply issues, but most of the time they can be resolved.

I also firmly believe in getting an ILCBC certified lactation consultant involved when there are any difficulties. They can be great help, and often solve whatever problems exist.

LizzyLaw06's picture
Joined: 05/20/07
Posts: 497

some women just can't produce the milk, they never have the 'let down'

other times the baby just won't latch. many babies don't latch right or mom isn't giving the the opportunity to latch, but work with a LC or pedi and they should be able to help with that.

some women can't get over the pain that comes with poor latch

personal experience for us with DD was she was tongue tied at birth. so she couldn't get a proper latch. the hospital wouldn't clip her tongue so we had to wait until the one week checkup to ask the pedi(then we had a referral to the ENT the next day in the same office to clip her tongue)

but that first week was hell. i wanted to bf so bad. i was brought to tears many times that week due to the stress of trying different things to get it to work. i thought several times about giving up, while DH told be to hang tight for the check up.

once her tongue was clipped it seriously was like magic that night trying it again. she latched right away, it didn't hurt me, and brought be happy tears for the first time. i then felt how beautiful bfing can be. (i'm tearing up just remembering this experience)

but like i said, i thought about giving up many times, so i would understand others in similar situations feeling like stopping. my no means is it giving up really, you gotta be happy about the experience, so it's not for everyone.

Cherrykitten's picture
Joined: 07/03/08
Posts: 700

Try not to stress about it too much. Some women, roughly 4-6% in the US, will have underlying issues that make it difficult to breastfeed. Most have issues with hormones, infertility, thyroid, PCOS, medications etc. If you have a normal pregnancy, did not do IVF, are under 40 and don't have any major underlying medical conditions then you have a 96% chance of being just fine Smile

Best thing to do is to find a Lactation consultant or La Leche League locally to you that you can call if there are issues that arise at anypoint. also, call your hospital and ask them what there breastfeeding polices are now and if they have a lactation consultant on staff.

And last but no least i am here if anyone needs anything at all Smile I may not be a full fledged LC yet (11 months and counting) but I'm willing to take a call and help out where i can and i'm the host of the Everything Breastfeeding board and will answer questions there as well!

Smile

mandi04's picture
Joined: 08/10/03
Posts: 2272

Ditto to Kat Smile I really don't have much advice, I've always had an abundant supply but I know it isn't quite so easy for some women. My oldest would not latch on properly at all and I ended up pumping exclusively for her, which while difficult I do not regret doing at all and I'm open to doing that again if needed. Part of the reason I'm pro-breastfeeding is because of the cost Lol so while she wouldn't latch I felt there was no reason to let the free stuff go to waste!

Joined: 12/21/09
Posts: 344

"Cherrykitten" wrote:

Try not to stress about it too much. Some women, roughly 4-6% in the US, will have underlying issues that make it difficult to breastfeed. Most have issues with hormones, infertility, thyroid, PCOS, medications etc. If you have a normal pregnancy, did not do IVF, are under 40 and don't have any major underlying medical conditions then you have a 96% chance of being just fine Smile

Best thing to do is to find a Lactation consultant or La Leche League locally to you that you can call if there are issues that arise at anypoint. also, call your hospital and ask them what there breastfeeding polices are now and if they have a lactation consultant on staff.

And last but no least i am here if anyone needs anything at all Smile I may not be a full fledged LC yet (11 months and counting) but I'm willing to take a call and help out where i can and i'm the host of the Everything Breastfeeding board and will answer questions there as well!

Smile

I would normally agree with you on an LC/LLL, but I was incredibly turned off by LLLI when I called them.
They pretty much blew me off. I was prepared for them to be overbearing and insist that the only possible way to feed my child was to nurse.
Instead, I got a girl who pretty much belittled me as if I was making a big deal out of something that didn't exist. That the pain was supposed to be there (I'm sorry, my nipples should NOT feel like someone is cutting them off with scissors, and it should NOT be more painful than giving birth to my beautiful little boy), and I needed to get over it. She never inquired to see me, she never asked about anything that might truly be a possibility of an issue, nothing.
I felt VERY unsupported, despite my attempts to nurse my baby. Even my homebirthing midwife and her apprentice who knew every single problem I had never even checked him for a tongue or lip tie. I was unimpressed.

It was disgusting to me, and not what I expected to receive from my hippy Oregon area, where at least 90% of the women I see always have a baby attached to their boob until the kid is like 4.

Joined: 12/21/09
Posts: 344

"mandi04" wrote:

Ditto to Kat Smile I really don't have much advice, I've always had an abundant supply but I know it isn't quite so easy for some women. My oldest would not latch on properly at all and I ended up pumping exclusively for her, which while difficult I do not regret doing at all and I'm open to doing that again if needed. Part of the reason I'm pro-breastfeeding is because of the cost Lol so while she wouldn't latch I felt there was no reason to let the free stuff go to waste!

No freaking kidding. I'm so done with $100+ a month of formula and $50+ a month for raw goat milk.

I could have a thousand other places to put that money.

Cherrykitten's picture
Joined: 07/03/08
Posts: 700

The thing to remember is that a Lacation consultant is a medical professional who has studied, trained and taken classed to earn the IBCLC board certification. A La Leche League leader is a support person who has experience and knowledge and has made themselves availabe to mothers. That said i have run into a few LLLL (and LCs for that matter) who have really bad bedside manner/personal skills. Those are the ones who make it harder on moms then it needs to be.

If you feel that you have a medical issue like improper latch, sore nipples, mastits, plugged ducts etc then you need to contact a LC to have the issue corrected in person.

Cherrykitten's picture
Joined: 07/03/08
Posts: 700

"epiclesis" wrote:

I would normally agree with you on an LC/LLL, but I was incredibly turned off by LLLI when I called them.
They pretty much blew me off. I was prepared for them to be overbearing and insist that the only possible way to feed my child was to nurse.
Instead, I got a girl who pretty much belittled me as if I was making a big deal out of something that didn't exist. That the pain was supposed to be there (I'm sorry, my nipples should NOT feel like someone is cutting them off with scissors, and it should NOT be more painful than giving birth to my beautiful little boy), and I needed to get over it.

You're right, your nipples should never hurt like that!!! That's a sign of underlying issues. You have to remember that LLLL are not allowed to physically see patients like an LC does and are usually supposed to remain "hands off."

Disneykat's picture
Joined: 01/02/07
Posts: 486

For me, my oldest did well, but completely self weaned at 6months. i would have gone longer with her(my goal was 12 months but we didn't make it that long)

with the twins? Shayna could not latch to save her life and it was stressing both of us out. Joseph was so tiny, I swear he had NO IDEA what to do with nursing. I did pump for 6 weeks though. It was incredibly hard to keep up with pumping for twins AND running after a 2 yr old.

zoe08's picture
Joined: 09/09/08
Posts: 665

I was not able to breastfeed Mason and I think it was a combination of not having enough supply, and him sleeping everytime I tried that he never sucked enough to really get a let down.

I BF exclusively for 2 weeks, and took him in to the LCs each week, and at 2 weeks he still wasn't gaining weight, so the LC told me nurse/supplement/pump and I tried that for a couple days before I gave up because I couldn't enjoy my baby because I didn't have time to just hold him because I wanted to, because by the time the cycle was done it was time to do it all over again. I felt awful trying so hard to do everything possible to keep him awake and nothing really worked. And the most I ever pumped was, I think once I was lucky enough to get out 2 ounces. And that was from both sides. The LC did a transfer weigh, and he was not really getting anything.

So I really hope it works better this time, I am planning to take my pump to the hospital and start pumping early on to hopefully help encourage me to produce more milk, and hopefully this baby will stay awake to eat (I say that and then she will probably not sleep at all!)

Joined: 03/16/15
Posts: 53852

i agree, some women just can't produce enough milk but other reasons may be that some times it can be very painful when you first start breastfeeding, the nipples can be so sore the first couple weeks, that many women stop, but if you can just get through the pain (and use lots of laniloh cream) the first couple weeks, after that, it doesn't hurt anymore. Smile

Roobear's picture
Joined: 03/26/08
Posts: 343

I think a good thing to remember is that BFing itself shouldn't hurt. There is a difference between your nipples not being used to this kind of abuse, and the discomfort that goes along with that, and absolute excrutiating pain. If you feel like you need to peel yourself off the ceiling cause it hurts so bad, that isn't right. Usually a sign of a bad latch, and you need to get help.

I will be honest, I was prepared for discomfort/pain, supply problems, latch issues etc because I deal with it every day. I recognize that I am very lucky, but I had literally zero problems. Hailey nursed at about 20 minutes of age, we never had any issues with latch or supply, I never had a plugged duct or mastitis, and was really only engorged for about a day. That being said, she cluster fed from midnight to 6 am every night for 6 weeks. I exclusively BF her for 16 months. She never needed a drop of formula, and we introduced cow's milk around 15 months as she was self weaning. She never even had a bottle till 6 months, and even then she never gave us a problem.

I know I have probably jinxed myself now for this LO! But don't get too worried about it, have a positive attitude and get help if you need it. Even for the mamas who struggled last time, its a new pregnancy and a new baby, and your body may react completely differently. You do what you have to do, and if that means supplementing or giving formula when you didn't want to, you can't beat yourself up about it. If you've done your best, thats all you can ask of yourself. Somethings are out of your control.

And remember...ANY breastmilk is beneficial to the baby. Even one nursing session after delivery can give the baby huge benefits.

Joined: 02/01/11
Posts: 67

I didn't breastfeed my first past the first few days. Her latch wasn't good and I was an emotional mess! I nursed my second for 13 months no problems. I think the thing that made the biggest difference was that I was in contact with a GREAT lactation consultant from day one. She helped me position baby and show me the easiest way to feed her...I have a very large chest and was having some difficulty managing myself. I would suggest finding out if your hosptial has a LC avalible and make sure when baby day comes the nurses know you want to see her as soon as possible. I asked that it be put in my chart as soon as I was admitted...I saw the LC less then 24 hours after having DD #2 Smile Don't stress and don't be afraid to ask questions!!!

LizzyLaw06's picture
Joined: 05/20/07
Posts: 497

LC's can be great. the one i had at the hospital was amazing. DD was born about 10am and the LC was probably there before the end of the day. She was the once that noticed DD being tongue tied. the set me up with a hospital breast pump right away and had me start pumping and showed me how to feed her with the little syringe close to the nipple to keep her there and trying to latch. she set me up with TONS of the premixed formula bottles and encouraged me to supplement knowing that until she was clipped it would be difficult.

there is tons of support out there, just remember that!

Disneykat's picture
Joined: 01/02/07
Posts: 486

I agree with requesting the LC right away. With DD1 we didn't see the LC until less than 24 hours before we left and I felt lost. With the twins, on of the CNA's was also an LC so she was AMAZING at helping with Shayna, when the LC wasn't available(I was not on the regular L&D floor since I had a few issues with BP, needing mag sulfate, etc. So we were all on different floors: L&D, Nicu and then me on the 2nd floor. Oy!!!)

Starflyr's picture
Joined: 10/20/07
Posts: 428

I think that the woman who CANNOT breastfeed is fairly uncommon - medical issues, breast reduction surgery, etc.

I think that there are LOTS of women who dont SUCCEED at breastfeeding due to lack of support. Most of our mothers didnt breastfeed, and we mostly didnt grow up watching women breastfeed, so there's generally not a ton of family support (not always). Lactation consultants in hospitals tend to be VERY busy, and finding one out of hospital can be expensive. LLL leaders CAN be very good....or very sucky. And pediatricians dont necessarily know what on earth they're talking about (I didnt until I BF'd Brayden).

Most issues that I have seen (in moms that really want to breastfeed for more than just a little at the beginning) are related to tongue and/or lip tie, improper latch, and not expecting it to be as time consuming and tiring as it really is (SOOO annoyed by the plethora of ppl who say "Oh, it's EASY! it shoudl NEVER hurt, you'll know what to do, it'll be great!" and follow it up with "dont worry, it'll be easy in a day or 2") Babies want to nurse 24/7 for about the first 6 weeks, and tend to go through major growth spurts at 10 days, 2, 3, 4, and 6 weeks. (6 weeks is a doozy).

I always tell the families of new moms that her ONLY job for the 1st 6 weeks is to take care of the baby. Cooking, cleaning, laundry, dishes, errands and older kid wrangling should be mostly taken care of by family members or friends if possible. (and mom shouldnt try to be supermom - which is a VERY COMMON thing - and usually leads to crappy supply due to not eating or drinking enough)

Star

jonibug's picture
Joined: 11/27/06
Posts: 781

ITA with everything Star said.

The worst for me was at 5 weeks I was put on low dose bc (supposedly won't affect your supply) and right after that dd had her 6 week growth spurt and clustered like crazy. After that she bf every two hours until I couldn't take it anymore at 6 months. After, I realized the bc messed with my supply. Thankfully I won't be taking it this time and hopefully won't have those problems.

Support is a key issue. When I was pregnant and would tell ppl I was going to bf, they would always respond with "IF you can bf" - not what a new mom needs to hear! Plus, dh should be completely on board. Mine is until 6 months, then we started having arguments (his mom bf him til 6 months so for some reason he thinks that is how it should be done).

Stress can seriously impact supply, as can not drinking enough or eating enough (very easy to forget about yourself early on).

MandyMommyto1's picture
Joined: 06/27/09
Posts: 534

In reality, the number of women who CAN'T nurse is very small statistically, this includes women with medical conditions that are controlled by medications, women who are HIV positive, things like that. If you have any medical conditions like that, your doctor will let you know that you can't breastfeed.

Otherwise, the issues women usually have with bf are situational, like a bad latch, poor family support, things like that. Supply, latch and other issues like that are definitely workable.

Personally, the first 6 weeks of nursing DD were excrutiating! She had very poor latch for the first 2 days in the hospital, and while I continued to try and waited to talk to the LC, my nipples got very damaged, I'm talking blisters and bleeding. Once we were able to see the LC and fix the latch, DD nursed properly and my supply was very plentiful, but I still had toe-curling pain everytime she fed for many weeks until I healed.
Having said that, I was very committed to bf, and worked through the pain with deep breathing ant Tylenol, and never resorted to using formula to supplement. Once you start supplementing, I feel that it is a slippery slope because obviously the demand on you to produce will decrease and thus your supply will decrease.

As you can see, I'm very pro-bf, not just because of the health and bonding benefits, but as someone else has mentioned, the cost!!

I truly believe that the vast majority of women can have a successful exclusive breastfeeding experience, but the education surrounding bf is not very good in some areas, and the culture in some areas is very challenging. Personally I have never had anyone comment on me bfing in public, or at restaurants or anything like that, but I know it happens to some women.

If you are committed, it can be done! It is the most special experience you will ever have with your baby, definitely give it a go and we're here for support if you need it!

Nell4Him's picture
Joined: 10/25/06
Posts: 2455

These ladies have already given you so much good information and helpful tips that really don't feel what I have to say will add anything to it. Smile

skylersmomma's picture
Joined: 04/10/11
Posts: 927

Thanks ladies for all the info. I bf'd with DS but that i had a hard time in the beginging with him being in nicu. but LC was great i have already scoutted out a ll group locally. I really want bf Kesler too.

Danifo's picture
Joined: 09/07/10
Posts: 1377

DD didn't latch at all for the first week despite all the LC visits i had. Every nurse tried to help me. The LCs came by 2x a day. I saw them every day after I left the hospital. I would try to nurse for 20 minutes, give a bottle for 20 minutes (pumped milk and formula) then pump for 20 minutes, then clean everything and eat/drink something. On repeat every 3 hours. It was exhausting. I don't think I cold have done it with more kids unless I had a lot of help. I told myself I would keep that schedule for 3 weeks and if it didn't get easier, something would have to be sacrificed. After the first week, I started to have more successful sessions with latching. By the end of the 2nd week, I could get her to latch at every feeding.

I didn't have supply issues but I was never able to pump very much at a time.

I hope this time the latching is not the same issue but it cold be or there could be different issues.

Joined: 01/25/11
Posts: 122

I am one of those few who cannot BF. I have no breast growth or changes during any of my pregnancies. I tried with DD1 and DD2 with no success. The girls would latch but since they were not getting anything they would get upset and eventually they would start screaming if I even held them in position to try again. This led me to try pumping but I was only able to get 1-1.5 ounces total from both sides each time. I would mix the little bit I got in formula so they were at least getting something.
I met with the LC at the hospital and our pediatrician is a LC but neither of them were able to fix the problem. I think my issues are hormonally based. I will try again this time but since I have seen the same lack of breast growth or changes this time, I am guessing that I will following the same routine this around too.

heatherliz2002's picture
Joined: 02/02/08
Posts: 2273

Most nursing problems can be solved with the help of a lactation consultant. I think a lot of women get discouraged because it is not easy at first. I read a lot of stuff that said it should never hurt if the baby is latched correctly... so not true! DD had a great latch right from the start, but it hurt for the first week or so until I toughened up- then it was totally fine. But, I'm not talking about crazy ridiculous pain. Just don't be surprised if it's uncomfortable at first! I double checked with the lactation consultant when I experienced pain, and she said everything was as it should be, and the pain should go away as my body adjusted. It did, and I breastfed for a year with zero problems. But it would have been really easy to give up during that first week or two. I'm really glad I stuck with it!

One other thought- some women can't pump, but have no problem actually nursing. Just because you can't pump doesn't mean you can't nurse. Sometimes it absolutely does, but not always. I couldn't pump- the entire time I was nursing I couldn't get more than 1/2 an ounce from each side. I think once or twice I got three ounces TOTAL. But, DD nursed without a problem, gained weight, never had trouble getting the milk she needed. I was completely freaked out about it because I thought if I couldn't get any milk with the pump that I didn't have any milk... totally not the case for me. My pediatrician was wonderful and assured me that as long as DD was doing fine, there was no reason to worry, and that some women just can't pump (a baby is always better at getting milk out than a pump). Obviously this isn't the case for everyone, but it does sometimes happen, which I didn't know until it happened to me.

One book that I found really helpful when I was pregnant with DD was Breastfeeding Made Simple: Seven Natural Laws for Nursing Mothers. I read several nursing books, but I was frustrated because they pretty much all said that if it hurts, the baby isn't latching correctly and to take them off and have them latch again. But they didn't tell you HOW to get the baby to latch correctly... how to do it, what it should look like, sound like, etc. This book actually took through what a correct latch is and how to do it correctly. I found it SO helpful. I didn't necessarily agree with everything in the book (it leans towards attachment parenting and while I have no problem with that, after a bit of experimenting we found that a different method worked best for our family) but the actual how-to was the best of any book I read.

Joined: 12/21/09
Posts: 344

Just as a tip, especially for new mommies...

I totally recommend the first years nipple butter.

I always heard "lanolin, lanolin, lanolin" in which I've recently researched isn't as great as some people make it out to be and not incredibly healthy. When my baby was born, my friend came over and gave me a cute little gift bag with this nipple butter in it (and she has nursed 5 kids, so she'd know! lol) and a couple other cute things, but I was loving it when I was trying so desperately hard to nurse.
It's all natural ingredients and some organic too, and it's perfectly safe to leave on when your baby latches to nurse.

Here's a link to what it looks like on their site. It says available at BRU. (Target used to sell it, but I guess not anymore.)
http://www.thefirstyears.com/product/detail/Y4625?locale=en_US

heatherliz2002's picture
Joined: 02/02/08
Posts: 2273

"epiclesis" wrote:

Just as a tip, especially for new mommies...

I totally recommend the first years nipple butter.

I always heard "lanolin, lanolin, lanolin" in which I've recently researched isn't as great as some people make it out to be and not incredibly healthy. When my baby was born, my friend came over and gave me a cute little gift bag with this nipple butter in it (and she has nursed 5 kids, so she'd know! lol) and a couple other cute things, but I was loving it when I was trying so desperately hard to nurse.
It's all natural ingredients and some organic too, and it's perfectly safe to leave on when your baby latches to nurse.

Here's a link to what it looks like on their site. It says available at BRU. (Target used to sell it, but I guess not anymore.)
http://www.thefirstyears.com/product/detail/Y4625?locale=en_US

That's a really good point. I would also recommend olive oil as an alternative to lanolin. One of the lactation consultants in the hospital recommended that I use it instead, and it worked great. I also didn't have to worry about the baby ingesting any chemicals or anything like that.

Cherrykitten's picture
Joined: 07/03/08
Posts: 700

One important thing to note is that:

Breastmilk is just as good as Lanolin!!!!!!! Simply expressing a small amount of breastmilk onto the nipple after feeding can help to heal sore nipples just as well and it's 100% natural and safe for baby Wink

Nell4Him's picture
Joined: 10/25/06
Posts: 2455

"Cherrykitten" wrote:

One important thing to note is that:

Breastmilk is just as good as Lanolin!!!!!!! Simply expressing a small amount of breastmilk onto the nipple after feeding can help to heal sore nipples just as well and it's 100% natural and safe for baby Wink

Agreed! It's also wonderful at treating diaper rashes! Smile

Joined: 12/21/09
Posts: 344

"Cherrykitten" wrote:

One important thing to note is that:

Breastmilk is just as good as Lanolin!!!!!!! Simply expressing a small amount of breastmilk onto the nipple after feeding can help to heal sore nipples just as well and it's 100% natural and safe for baby Wink

I heard that (along with hundreds of other things bm is good for, lol).... but I was so bad off I couldn't even express any milk. Ever.

turtnjay's picture
Joined: 02/24/09
Posts: 2095

"Starflyr" wrote:

I think that the woman who CANNOT breastfeed is fairly uncommon - medical issues, breast reduction surgery, etc.

I think that there are LOTS of women who dont SUCCEED at breastfeeding due to lack of support. Most of our mothers didnt breastfeed, and we mostly didnt grow up watching women breastfeed, so there's generally not a ton of family support (not always). Lactation consultants in hospitals tend to be VERY busy, and finding one out of hospital can be expensive. LLL leaders CAN be very good....or very sucky. And pediatricians dont necessarily know what on earth they're talking about (I didnt until I BF'd Brayden).

Most issues that I have seen (in moms that really want to breastfeed for more than just a little at the beginning) are related to tongue and/or lip tie, improper latch, and not expecting it to be as time consuming and tiring as it really is (SOOO annoyed by the plethora of ppl who say "Oh, it's EASY! it shoudl NEVER hurt, you'll know what to do, it'll be great!" and follow it up with "dont worry, it'll be easy in a day or 2") Babies want to nurse 24/7 for about the first 6 weeks, and tend to go through major growth spurts at 10 days, 2, 3, 4, and 6 weeks. (6 weeks is a doozy).

I always tell the families of new moms that her ONLY job for the 1st 6 weeks is to take care of the baby. Cooking, cleaning, laundry, dishes, errands and older kid wrangling should be mostly taken care of by family members or friends if possible. (and mom shouldnt try to be supermom - which is a VERY COMMON thing - and usually leads to crappy supply due to not eating or drinking enough)

Star

Lurker...

This is a great thread!!! And I so agree with your entire post but especially the bold section.

I HATE hearing that!!! It does hurt! I saw LC and LC with DS#4 and they all said, perfect latch! He's a champ! But I was blistered and cracking. It was terrible. Unfortunately he had to be readmitted for bili levels and our BF was pretty much obliterated but I pumped for a few months but also had to supplement as my supply just kept dwindling.

I'm going to give it a try again and I am really hoping for it to work this time around.

Danifo's picture
Joined: 09/07/10
Posts: 1377

I agree that they shouldn't say it shouldn't hurt. If it hurts, you should seek help to check but it isn't an indication that it isn't working or you are doing anything wrong.

All the LCs I dealt with were great. They were also very open to the idea of doing a supplement/pumped milk system since I couldn't pump enough to feed. That made me feel like I could at least BF partially which made me feel better. After i was able to actually nurse, no supplementation was necessary.

When I told one LC that the repeat schedule of trying to nurse, feeding and pumping was wearing me out, she said the most important thing for the baby (and BF) is a happy mom and it was ok to just get someone else to give her a bottle only without pumping if it would help me get sleep. I only did that once but it was nice to know that was an option and not something she would condem me for.

Some people I know went through LLL and unfortunately, they got the super strict BF only people. When they went in with problems of no weight gain, no poopy diapers after a week, they just kept getting told to keep at it and any form of supplementation would ruin any chance of BF. No real help or guidance was provided on how to fix the problems other than to keep trying and anything less than 100% BF was failure. Needless to say that BF didn't work for those people.

ekcanada's picture
Joined: 05/06/09
Posts: 1707

You have been given a ton of advice and every woman is different.

My experience was that is was incredibly painful for the first few weeks. I blistered and my nipples cracked but once we both figured out what we were doing, it was very easy and conveinient while out and about. LC are fantastic and latch is the most important thing to master (in my opinion).

My advice is get through the first couple weeks.

I don't know if I should generalize this but watch for signs of thrush in you baby (white milky coating in their mouth that can't be scraped off). If it is not treated, you can both pass it back and forth.

Also, if you feel pain in your breasts and feel like you have the flu, you could be suffering from Mastitis and will also need to be treated.

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