Is Macrobid Safe During Pregnancy?

QUESTION

The doctor wants me to to take Macrobid for a urinary tract infection but she wants me to start before the results even come back and that just stupid to me.

She said if I have one that I don't treat immediately it's more dangerous for the baby than antibiotics but I really don't want to take them especially since my only symptom is white blood cells in the urine.

I know it's supposedly safe but there are some forums where people blame that medicine for their baby's death. How much worse could a UTI get (if I actually have one) in the week it'll take to get the results?

ANSWER

Macrobid is considered safe for most of pregnancy, but we do use it a bit more cautiously after 38 weeks. What the doctor is concerned about is the possibility that the "bugs" could get ahead of us, and the UTI could become pyelonephritis. Pyelo is not that big a deal, and can even be treated out-patient in most cases, UNLESS you are pregnant, in which case it can become much more serious much more rapidly.

Most of us who care for pregnant women have seen the case of the otherwise perfectly healthy woman whose UTI didn't bother them that much until they were in very serious trouble. In these cases, literally hours can make the difference between whether she lives or dies (and her baby with her).

These do not happen very often, fortunately, but having watched it myself, where it was literally a toss-up which side was going to triumph, the bugs or the antibiotics and other treatments we were giving her, for days and days, none of us wants to "go there" when the whole thing could have been prevented.

That said, of course it is your right to refuse any treatment. What is not ok, as far as I'm concerned, is to say that you will take the medicine and then not do it. It is better to say up front that you do not plan to take the medicine so your provider can be prepared if necessary.
~Cynthia

Comments

Macrobid

In my first pregnancy, my doctor had me take Macrobid for days because I had an infection. I was just over six weeks and unfortunately I lost my baby after that. This is not to scare you but to prepare you. Every woman is different on how they're body handles medication. Take care.

Cynthia Flynn

Cynthia Flynn, CNM. PhD, is the General Director of the Family Health and Birth Center which provides prenatal, birth, postnatal, gynecological and primary health care to underserved women and their families in Washington, D.C. Recently Cynthia served as Associate Professor of Nursing at Seattle University. There she not only taught, but remained in full scope clinical midwifery practice at Valley Medical Center where she cared for pregnant and birthing women, and practices well-woman gynecology, family planning, and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases.

Cynthia founded Columbia Women's Clinic and Birth Center, where she took care of pregnant women and infants up to two weeks of age and attended both birth center and hospital births. Before Cynthia earned her CNM, she worked as a registered nurse in labor and delivery and postpartum and is a certified Doula and Doula trainer.