Breastfeeding

Starting Solid Foods

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Pediatric societies around the world recommend exclusive breastfeeding to about six months. Most babies do fine with exclusive breastfeeding to six months of age or even a little longer. You should start your baby on solids when s/he shows signs of being ready for solids, not by the calendar.

Illness and Breastfeeding

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Over the years, far too many women have been wrongly told they had to stop breastfeeding. Does the addition of a small amount of medication to the mother's milk make breastfeeding more hazardous than formula feeding? The answer is almost never. Breastfeeding with a little drug in the milk is almost always safer.

Breastfeeding and Jaundice

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Jaundice is due to a buildup in the blood of bilirubin, a yellow pigment that comes from the breakdown of old red blood cells. It is normal for old red blood cells to break down, but the bilirubin formed does not usually cause jaundice because the liver metabolizes it and gets rid of it into the gut.

Using Gentian Violet

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Gentian violet (1% solution in water) is still an excellent treatment for Candida albicans. Candida albicans is a fungus that may cause an infection of skin and/or mucous membranes (inside of mouth, for example) in both children and adults. In small children, this yeast is a frequent cause of white patches in the mouth (thrush), or diaper rash.

Finger and Cup Feeding

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Finger feeding is a method that helps train the baby to take the breast. It can also be used to avoid artificial nipples, but its primary purpose is to help latch on a baby who refuses to latch on. Cup feeding, which is is better than a bottle, should be used to feed a baby who is not yet taking the breast.

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