Postpartum Articles

  • Ten most essential postpartum items for mom

    Your baby's due any day now. What will you need on hand those first few days post-delivery? Here's our 10 postpartum must-haves.

  • Plan ahead for baby's first weeks at home

    During your first weeks together, you and your baby may feel just as dazed and confused. What can you do to make it easier? Get ready! You owe it to yourself and your baby to prepare in advance and line up as much support as you can.

  • Postpartum Nutrition for the New Mom

    If you're pregnant, you could be daydreaming about holding your precious baby for the first time or hopefully fitting back into your favorite jeans. Another topic that you'll want to consider is your body's post pregnancy needs.

  • Postpartum Anxiety

    Now that the baby's here, have you become a professional worrywart? One of the most common symptoms of postpartum depression is anxiety. Use these helpful suggestions to help keep it under control.

  • This is Your Brain on the Postpartum Blues

    Elevated levels of a brain protein known to deplete the body of feel-good hormones like serotonin may be responsible for triggering powerful feelings of sadness in new mothers.

  • C-Section: Not What They Were Expecting

    Experts say the advice women receive prior to discharge from hospital after c-section needs to be revised to consider the context of women's and their families' lived reality.

  • Top Ten Tips for New Moms

    You may find that some of the expectations you had for your first weeks with new baby are far from the reality. Below you will find some of our favorite mom-to-mom tips for helping you through this initial honeymoon period with your new baby:

  • Postpartum Depression: Improving Your Self-Esteem

    If your self-esteem has always left something to be desired, this is an excellent time to start shedding the old negative thoughts. Here are some tips to get you on the road to recovery:

  • Postpartum Depression: Debunking Denial

    Many people buy into the stigma that because much of postpartum depression manifests itself emotionally, it's a sign of weakness and should be under the control of the person. Not true! Dr. Shosh shares the real PPD facts with us.

  • Placentophagy: "Ewww! Why Would You Eat That!

    Most mammals eat their placenta. Would you? Studies show eating the placenta can curb postpartum depression, replenish nutrients, increase milk production, and slow postpartum hemorrhage.

  • Help Your Baby Breastfeed Before It's Even Born

    A growing body of research reveals profound connections between a woman's birth experience and her ability to get breastfeeding off to a good start. But if you think of putting your baby to your breast as the fourth stage of labor it can help you visualize this connection.

  • Placentophagy: "Ewww! Why Would You Eat That!

    Most mammals eat their placenta. Would you? Studies show eating the placenta can curb postpartum depression, replenish nutrients, increase milk production, and slow postpartum hemorrhage.

  • C.C.: A Story of Courage

    by C.C. Howell

  • Pregnancy Hair Loss

    Telogen effluvium is the excessive shedding of hair that occurs one to five months following pregnancy. This is not uncommon, affecting somewhere between 40 to 50% of women

  • Looking ahead: Your Hospital Stay After Birth

    Now that your baby's here, what can you expect from the hospital staff? Along with caring for you and your baby after birth, the hospital staff can answer any questions you may have, help you and your partner get to know your newborn, and build your confidence as your baby's caregivers and parent.

  • Ten most essential postpartum items for mom

    Your baby's due any day now. What will you need on hand those first few days post-delivery? Here's our 10 postpartum must-haves.

  • Postpartum Bleeding: Normal or Cause for Concern?

    Regardless of whether your delivery was via c-section or a vaginal birth, postpartum bleeding will be part of your reality. Immediately following delivery and for approximately 4- 7 days after, your discharge can be expected to be bright red.

  • Post Partum Tips: Breast-Feeding Problems and Signs of Trouble

    Try putting on some soothing music or having a cup of decaffeinated tea. The more you are able to relax, the easier let-down will occur. If you are experiencing pain that is preventing you from relaxing during nursing, see the section below on pain management.

  • Partner's Guide to the Baby Blues and Postpartum Depression

    The baby blues are common mood swings experienced after childbirth. Keep an eye out for these symptoms and be as supportive as possible. Remember your partner's body has been through a tough nine months and hormones are rampant. These symptoms should disappear within 10 days.

  • C-Section: Not What They Were Expecting

    Experts say the advice women receive prior to discharge from hospital after c-section needs to be revised to consider the context of women's and their families' lived reality.