milk supply

Nursing Strike at 4 1/2 Months?

Kathleen Tackett's picture

QUESTION

Dear Lactation Consultant,
Our 4 1/2 month-old boy, Sam, has been breastfed since he was born. My wife went back to work at 3 months and we out of necessity we started feeding him breast milk from bottles. We occasionally give him formula as well. But over the last week he has been reluctant to breastfeed and for two days has refused to breastfeed completely. He obviously likes the bottle because it is easier to draw the milk from.

Did I Just Not Give It Enough Time?

Kathleen Tackett's picture

QUESTION

Dear Lactation Consultant,
Hi there. I could not find that this question has been asked so I am going to ask. With my first child I had a c-section. I tried nursing as soon as I could (which ended up being after I was in recovery for 2 hours and they had already given him a bottle). I tried to nurse him but it didn't seem like there was any milk. I tried pumping to get the milk flowing but nothing came out.

Lactation Suppression

Once your milk supply is established, stopping abruptly causes certain physical changes. Your breasts will continue to produce milk for a while, you may become engorged, and possibly develop mastitis. Here are some suggestions that may minimize your discomfort, and avoid potential problems.

Increasing Your Milk Supply

by Anne Smith, IBCLC

Nearly all nursing mothers worry at one time or another about whether their babies are getting enough milk. Since we can't measure breastmilk intake the way we can formula intake, it is easy to be insecure about the adequacy of our milk supplies. The "perception" of insufficient breastmilk production is the most common reason mothers give for weaning or early introduction of solids or supplements. Although there is a very small percentage of women who can't produce enough milk no matter what they do, this is very rare.